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Sweden -- Riksdag (Parliament) Act Index Page Document Table of Contents

    { ICL Document Status: 1 Jan 2015 }

    { Editor's Note:
    The Riksdag Act is not among the four fundamental laws that make up the Constitution of Sweden (cf. Article 3 Instrument of Government). Therefore, it is not part of the Swedish Constitution in a formal sense. It is, however, constitutional in substance as it regulates the proceedings of the Parliament.
    The 2015 ICL edition is based on the official translation published by the Parliament. It was prepared by A. Meister. The edition adds article titles and adopts the ICL style for the translation of normative content without the use of "shall". The special numbering of added articles includes the chapter (e.g., Article 2.2.1 for Chapter 2, Article 2, added Article 1) as in the official publication. }

 

Chapter 1  Introductory Provisions

 
Article 1 The Contents of the Parliament Act
(1) This Act contains provisions about the Parliament.
(2) Provisions on elections to the Parliament, the work of the Parliament, and the tasks of the Parliament are laid down in the Instrument of Government.
(3) The Act is divided into main provisions and supplementary provisions. Rules concerning the enactment and amendment of the provisions of the Parliament Act are laid down in Chapter 8, Article 17 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 2  The Disposition of the Parliament Act
The Parliament Act contains 14 chapters. These are:
-- introductory provisions (Chapter 1);
-- elections to the Parliament (Chapter 2);
-- Parliament sessions (Chapter 3);
-- direction and planning of the work of the Parliament (Chapter 4);
-- the members of the Parliament (Chapter 5);
-- the Chamber (Chapter 6);
-- the Parliament committees and the Committee on European Union Affairs (Chapter 7);
-- interpellations and questions to ministers (Chapter 8);
-- introduction of business (Chapter 9);
-- preparation of business (Chapter 10);
-- settlement of business (Chapter 11);
-- elections within the Parliament (Chapter 12);
-- Parliament bodies and boards (Chapter 13); and
-- the Parliament Administration (Chapter 14).
 
Article 3  Definitions
For the purposes of this Act, the following terms have the definitions set out in this article:
-- electoral period: the time from the date on which the newly-elected Parliament convenes to the date on which the Parliament elected next thereafter convenes;
-- Parliament session: the period during which the Parliament meets;
-- longest-serving member of those present in the Chamber: if two or more members have served in the Parliament for an equally long period, the eldest of them has precedence;
-- group leader: the special representative appointed by a party group which has received at least four per cent of the national vote at the election to the Parliament to confer with the Speaker under this Act;
-- plenary meeting: a meeting of the Chamber at which committee reports and statements may be taken up for deliberation and settlement.
 

Chapter 2  Elections to the Parliament

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on elections to the Parliament.
 
Article 2 Time of Ordinary Elections
Ordinary elections to the Parliament are held in September.
 
Article 2.2.1 Extraordinary Elections
Provisions concerning extraordinary elections to the Parliament are laid down in Chapter 3, Article 11, and Chapter 6, Article 5 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 3 Further Provisions on Elections
Further provisions on elections to the Parliament are laid down in the Instrument of Government and in law.
 

Chapter 3  Parliament Sessions

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
--Parliament sessions after an election to the Parliament (Articles 2--5),
--the opening of the Parliament session (Article 6); and
--other provisions concerning Parliament sessions (Articles 7--9).
 

[Part 1]  Parliament Sessions after an Election to the Parliament

 
Article 2 Start of the Parliament Sessions
A newly-elected Parliament convenes for a new session in accordance with the provisions laid down in Chapter 3, Art. 10 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 3.2.1 Time of First Meeting after an Election
The first meeting of the Chamber in a Parliament session after an election starts at 11 a.m. The members must be informed of the time of the meeting.
 
Article 3 First Meeting
At the first meeting of the Chamber after an election to the Parliament, the following takes place in the order set out below:
1. a report from the Election Review Board concerning the examination of the election warrants of members and alternate members is presented;
2. a roll-call of members is taken;
3. a Speaker and First, Second and Third Deputy Speaker are elected for the electoral period; and
4. a Nominations Committee is appointed for the electoral period.
 
Article 3.3.1 Chair of the First Meeting After an Election
The longest-serving member of those present in the Chamber presides over the meeting until the Speaker and Deputy Speakers have been elected.
 
Article 4 Procedure for Election of Speakers
(1) In accordance with Chapter 4, Article 2 of the Instrument of Government, the Parliament elects a Speaker and First, Second and Third Deputy Speaker. The Speakers are elected individually in the above order. They are elected for the duration of the electoral period.
(2) If the election of the Speaker is held by secret ballot in accordance with the provisions in Chapter 12, the candidate obtaining more than half of the votes is elected. If no such majority is obtained, a new election is held. If no candidate receives more than half of the votes on this occasion either, a third election is held between the two candidates obtaining the highest number of votes in the second election. The person receiving the most votes in the third election is elected.
 
Article 5 Procedure for Appointment of Nominations Committee
Each party group which corresponds to a party which obtained at least four per cent of the national vote at the election to the Parliament has a seat on the Nominations Committee. A further ten seats are distributed proportionately among the same party groups. The members are appointed on the basis of the procedure set out in Chapter 12, Article 14.
 
Article 3.5.1 Number of Members in the Nominations Committee
The Speaker determines how many members each party group appoints to the Nominations Committee. In making the proportional distribution, the basis of calculation set out in Chapter 12, Article 8, paragraph three, is applied.
 

[Part 2]  The Opening of the Parliament Session

 
Article 6 Special Meeting for the Opening of the Parliament Session
(1) A special meeting of the Chamber for the formal opening of a Parliament session takes place no later than the third day of the session. At the request of the Speaker, the Head of State declares the session open. If the Head of State is unable to attend, the Speaker declares the session open.
(2) At this meeting, the Prime Minister delivers a statement of Government policy unless there are special grounds why he or she should refrain from doing so.
 
Article 3.6.1 Time of Meeting for the Opening of the Parliament Session
(1) The formal opening of the session after an election to the Parliament takes place at 2 p.m. on the second day of the session.
(2) In years in which no election to the Parliament has been held, the formal opening takes place on the first day of the session at the same time.
(3) The Speaker may appoint another time for the meeting.
 

[Part 3]  Other Provisions Concerning Parliament Sessions

 
Article 7 Length of the Parliament Session
A Parliament session continues until the start of the next session.
 
Article 8 Other Parliament Sessions during the Electoral Period
In years in which no ordinary election to the Parliament is held, a new session starts on that date in September determined by the Chamber at the preceding session.
 
Article 3.8.1 Proposal Regarding Time of First Meeting
The Parliament Board presents a proposal to the Chamber ahead of decisions in accordance with Article 8.
 
Article 3.8.2 Roll-Call at Other Parliament Sessions
The Speaker may also determine that a roll-call of members is to take place at the first meeting of the Chamber at other sessions during the electoral period. If no roll-call is held, a list of all members at the start of the Parliament session is attached to the record of the meeting.
 
Article 9 New Parliament Session after Extraordinary Election
If an extraordinary election has been announced prior to the date appointed, a new session starts in accordance with the Article 8, provided the Parliament convenes before 1 July the same year as a result of the extraordinary election.
 

Chapter 4  Direction and Planning of the Work of the Parliament

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on direction and planning of the work of the Parliament.
 
Article 2 The Speaker and Deputy Speaker
The Speaker, or in his or her place one of the Deputy Speakers, directs the work of the Parliament.
 
Article 3 Group Leaders
(1) Each of the party groups under Chapter 3, Article 5 appoints a special representative (group leader) to confer with the Speaker concerning the work of the Chamber, in accordance with provisions laid down in this Act.
(2) The party groups appoint a personal alternate for the group leader (deputy group leader).
 
Article 4.3.1 Information about Decisions Made after Conferral
Decisions made after conferral are made available for the members. This occurs as determined by the Speaker.
 
Article 4 The Parliament Administration
(1) The Parliament Administration is led by a Board.
(2) Provisions concerning the tasks of the Parliament Administration are laid down in Chapter 14.
 
Article 4.4.1 The Parliament Board
(1) The Parliament Board directs the Parliament Administration and deliberates on the organization of the work of the Parliament.
(2) The Parliament Board consists of the Speaker as chair and ten other members whom the Parliament appoints from among its members for the duration of the electoral period. The Parliament also appoints ten deputies for the appointed members of the Parliament Board.
 
Article 4.4.2 Meetings of the Parliament Board
(1) The Parliament Board convenes at a summons from the Speaker. If the Speaker is unable to attend a meeting, one of the Deputy Speakers will take his or her place as chair. The place of an absent member is taken by a deputy belonging to the same party group.
(2) The Parliament Board meets behind closed doors. If the Board wishes to obtain information from a person who is not a member of the Board, it may summon him or her to attend a meeting.
(3) The Deputy Speakers, those of the group leaders who are not members of the Board, and the Secretary-General of the Parliament may participate in the deliberations of the Board.
 
Article 5 The Chairmen's Conference
The Chairmen's Conference deliberates on matters of common concern for the activities
of the Chamber, the Parliament committees and the Committee on European Union Affairs.
 
Article 4.5.1 Composition of the Chairmen's Conference
The Chairmen's Conference consists of the Speaker, acting as
chair, and the chairs of the Parliament committees and the Committee on European Union Affairs.
 

Chapter 5  The Members of the Parliament

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
(1) This chapter contains provisions on the mandate of members of the Parliament.
(2) Provisions regarding the mandate are also laid down in Chapter 4, Articles 10--13 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 2 Remuneration
A member of the Parliament receives remuneration out of public funds. More detailed provisions regarding remuneration and economic conditions for members of the Parliament and alternate members are laid down in law.
 
Article 5.2.1 Registration of Commitments and Financial Interests
Provisions regarding registration of members' commitments and financial interests are laid down in the Act concerning the registration of MPs' commitments and financial interests (1996:810).
 
Article 3 Leave of Absence
A member of the Parliament may be granted leave of absence from his or her duties. If a member has been granted leave of absence for at least one month, the member's duties are carried out by an alternate for the duration of his or her absence.
 
Examination of Application for Leave of Absence
(1) An application for leave of absence is considered by the Speaker, with the restrictions set out in paragraph two.
(2) An application for reasons other than illness or parental leave for a period of one month or more is considered by the Chamber.
(3) If, however, an application is made during a break of more than one month in the work of the Chamber, the Speaker may determine whether leave is granted.
 
Article 5.4.1 Contents of an Application for Leave of Absence
An application for leave of absence is written, includes the reasons for the application and relates to a specific period. Applications are submitted to the Parliament Administration.
 
Article 5 Alternates
When an alternate member is to replace the Speaker, a member of the Parliament who is a Government minister, or a member of the Parliament who has been granted leave of absence, the Speaker summons the alternate to take up his or her duties. The Speaker follows the order of precedence between the alternates that is laid down in law. The Speaker may, however, depart from this order where special grounds exist.
 
Article 5.5.1 Notification of Alternates
An alternate member who is to exercise a mandate as a member of the Parliament receives notification, indicating the member whom he or she will replace and the period of the appointment. An alternate may receive a separate notification of the date on which the appointment terminates.
 
Article 6 Status of Alternates in the Case of Resignation by a Member of the Parliament
If a member of the Parliament who is on leave of absence resigns his or her mandate, the alternate member who has been replacing that member continues to exercise the mandate until a new member has been appointed.
 
Article 7 Prosecution or Deprivation of Liberty
(1) In certain cases under Chapter 4, Section 12, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government, legal proceedings may not be initiated against a member of the Parliament and neither may a member of the Parliament be deprived of his or her personal liberty without the consent of the Parliament. The same applies to former members of the Parliament.
(2) An application for the consent of the Parliament is submitted by a prosecutor, or any other person wishing to initiate legal proceedings, to the Speaker.
(3) If the application is so incomplete that it cannot be used as a basis for consideration by the Parliament, or if the applicant has failed to demonstrate that he or she is competent to raise charges or apply for such action to be taken by a public authority, the Speaker rejects the application. In any other case, the Speaker notifies the matter to a meeting of the Chamber.
 
Application for Consent
An application under Article 7 is submitted in writing and contains the grounds for the application.
 

Chapter 6  The Chamber

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
--planning and direction of meetings (Articles 2--6);
--meetings (Articles 7--14);right to speak at meetings (Articles 15--19);
--legislative debates (Articles 20--22);
--special debates (Article 23); and
--common provisions (Articles 24-27).
 

[Part 1]  Planning and Direction of Meetings

 
Article 2 Planning
The Speaker determines the planning of the work of the Chamber and when the Chamber meets.
 
Article 6.2.1 Conferral ahead of Planning
Ahead of decisions under Article 2, the Speaker confers with the Parliament Board.
 
Article 3 The Speaker
The Speaker presides over the meetings of the Chamber.
 
Article 6.3.1 Assistance to the Speaker
When presiding over the meetings of the Chamber, the Speaker is assisted by a clerk of the Chamber.
 
Article 4 Deputy Speaker
The Speaker may delegate to a Deputy Speaker the duty of presiding over a meeting.
 
Article 5 Longest-Serving Member in the Chamber
If the Speaker and all the Deputy Speakers are unable to attend, the member among those present who has been a member of the Parliament longest presides over the meeting.
 
Article 6 Impartiality of the Speaker
The Speaker is debarred from speaking on the substance of any matter under deliberation which has been entered in the order paper. The same applies to the Deputy Speaker or member presiding over a meeting of the Chamber.
 

[Part 2]  Meetings

 
Article 7 Openness at Meetings
(1) Meetings of the Chamber are open to the public in accordance with the provisions laid down in Chapter 4, Article 9 of the Instrument of Government.
(2) The Chamber may determine that a meeting is held behind closed doors, if necessary, with regard to the security of the Realm, or otherwise, with regard to relations with another state or an international organization.
(3) If the Government is to provide information to the Parliament at a meeting, the Government may also determine, on the grounds given in paragraph two, that the meeting is held behind closed doors.
 
Article 8 Duty of Confidentiality
A member or official of the Parliament may not, without authority, disclose anything that has occurred at a meeting held behind closed doors. The Chamber may waive the duty of confidentiality, in whole or in part, in a particular case.
 
Article 9 Summons
(1) The Chamber convenes in response to a summons from the Speaker unless otherwise provided in the Instrument of Government or in this Act.
(2) A summons is posted no later than 6 p.m. on the day prior to the meeting and at least fourteen hours in advance. In exceptional circumstances, a summons may be posted later. In such a case, the meeting takes place only if more than half the members of the Parliament consent to this.
 
Article 10 Contents of a Summons
The summons indicates whether the meeting is a plenary meeting at which committee reports and statements may be taken up for settlement.
 
Article 6.10.1 Other Information in a Summons
The summons indicates if an election is to be held at the meeting.
 
Article 11 Break in the Work of the Chamber after a Decision to Call an Extraordinary Election
If the Government has decided to call an extraordinary election, the Speaker may determine in response to a request from the Government, that the work of the Chamber is suspended for the remainder of the electoral period.
 
Article 12 Extraordinary Meeting
(1) The Speaker may decide to convene a meeting of the Chamber during a break in the work of the Chamber. Such a decision is taken if requested by the Government or by at least one hundred and fifteen members of the Parliament.
(2) A meeting is held within ten days from the submission of such a request. A meeting may only be held after all the members have been given reasonable time to turn up after being notified of the summons.
(3) During a period in which plenary meetings are not normally planned, a plenary meeting may be held in less than 48 hours from the time members are notified of the summons only if at least three quarters of those entitled to vote and more than half of the members of the Parliament vote in favor of settling the matter.
 
Article 6.12.1 Notification of Time for Extraordinary Meeting
Notice of the time of the first such meeting under Article 12 is published.
 
Article 13 Order Paper
(1) The Speaker prepares an order paper for each meeting listing all matters on the table of the Chamber. An exception may be made for a matter which it is assumed will be dealt with behind closed doors. The order paper is made available for the members of the Parliament.
(2) The order paper indicates whether the meeting is a plenary meeting.
(3) At the meeting, business and elections are dealt with in the order in which they appear on the order paper.
 
Article 6.13.1 Motions That Are to Be Entered as the First Item of the Order Paper
A motion calling for a referendum on a matter of fundamental law, a vote on a Prime Minister in accordance with Chapter 6, Article 3 of the Instrument of Government, a proposal for a new Prime Minister or a motion calling for a declaration of no confidence is entered as the first item on the order paper. If there are several such matters, they are taken in the order indicated above. The Speaker may determine another order between a vote on a Prime Minister and a motion calling for a declaration of no confidence.
 
Article 6.13.2 Contents of the Order Paper
(1) In addition to the provisions laid down in Chapter 6, Article 13.1, the following is entered on the order paper:
1. elections;
2. Government bills and written communications from the Government, submissions and reports from Parliament bodies, private members' motions and documents from the EU which are to be referred to a committee;
3. committee reports and statements which are to be tabled, debated or settled, or if a committee or the Speaker have proposed that a matter is taken up for settlement after a shorter period than that laid down in Chapter 11, Article 2, paragraph one;
4. decisions and information about any changes in the list of members;
5. other decisions to be taken by the Chamber;
6. notice of specially-arranged debates; and
7. other questions to the extent determined by the Speaker.
(2) In addition, notice that a minister intends to deliver an oral statement at a meeting of the Chamber should be entered in the order paper. If possible, a motion calling for a draft law to be held in abeyance for twelve months is entered in the order paper.
 
Article 14 Decision to Terminate or Adjourn a Meeting
A decision to terminate or adjourn a meeting in progress is taken by the Chamber without prior deliberation.
 

[Part 3]  Right to Speak at Meetings of the Chamber

 
Article 15 Right to Speak
Every member of the Parliament and every minister is entitled to speak freely at a meeting on all matters under deliberation and on the legality of all that takes place at the meeting, with the exceptions laid down in this Act.
 
Article 16 Restriction on the Right to Speak
(1) A person who has the floor confines his or her contribution to the matter under deliberation. Should anyone offend against this provision and fail to comply with the Speaker's admonition, the Speaker may debar him or her from speaking for the remainder of the deliberations.
(2) No speaker at a meeting may speak inappropriately of another person, use personally insulting language, or otherwise behave in word or deed in a way that contravenes good order. Should anyone offend against this provision, the Speaker may debar him or her from speaking for the remainder of the deliberations.
 
Article 6.16.1 Rules for the Chamber
After conferring with the group leaders, the Speaker may decide to adopt rules for the Chamber.
 
Article 17 Declaration of Office by the Head of State
The Head of State may deliver a declaration of office before the Chamber.
 
Article 18 Oral Information from the Government
The Government may provide information to the Parliament by means of an oral statement delivered by a minister at a meeting of the Chamber.
 
Article 19 Disqualification
(1) No one may be present at a meeting when a matter is being deliberated which personally concerns himself or herself or a close associate.
(2) A minister may however participate in the deliberation of a matter concerning the performance of his or her official duties.
 

[Part 4]  Legislative Debates

 
Article 20 Arrangement of Debates
The Speaker confers with the group leaders concerning the arrangement of debates in the Chamber.
 
Article 21 Limitation during Debates
(1) The Parliament may prescribe a limit to the number of contributions a speaker may make during the deliberation of a matter and the duration of such contributions in a supplementary provision of this Act. A distinction may be made in this connection between different categories of speakers.
(2) Such limitation of the right to speak as referred to in paragraph one may be made in conjunction with the deliberation of a particular issue in response to a proposal from the Speaker. The decision is taken without prior deliberation.
(3) Every person wishing to speak on an issue is however entitled to speak for at least four minutes.
 
Article 6.21.1 Notice of Wish to Speak in a Debate
(1) A contribution by a member who has not given prior notice of his or her wish to participate in a debate is limited to four minutes, unless the Speaker allows an extension. A further contribution by a member who has already spoken during the deliberation of a particular issue is limited to two minutes.
(2) Notice is to be given to the Parliament Administration no later than 4.30 p.m. on the day prior to the meeting at which the deliberations will commence. Such notice indicates the expected duration of the contribution.
(3) The rules laid down in paragraphs one and two may not apply when a reply is given to an interpellation or a question.
 
Article 22 Order of Speakers
(1) The Speaker determines the order of speakers from among those giving notice before the deliberation of a particular issue that they wish to speak. Members asking leave to speak during the deliberations speak in the order in which they give notice to this effect.
(2) Irrespective of the order of speakers, and without prior notice, the Speaker may:
1. give the floor to a minister who has not previously spoken; and
2. give the floor to a minister or a member who has previously spoken for the purpose of making a rejoinder to the speech of a previous speaker.
(3) After conferring with the group leaders, the Speaker may decide to give the floor to a minister or a member for a rejoinder before he or she has made his or her contribution. A distinction may be made in this connection between different categories of speakers.
 
Article 6.22.1 Possibility for a Minister to Speak
Irrespective of the order of speakers and without having given prior notice, a minister who has not spoken previously in the deliberation of a particular issue may be given the floor for a contribution of no more than ten minutes.
 
Article 6.22.2 Rejoinders
A rejoinder is requested during an ongoing contribution. The duration of a rejoinder may not exceed two minutes unless the Speaker permits an extension to four minutes on special grounds. Each speaker may make two rejoinders to the same contribution. If the Speaker has already given a member leave to make a rejoinder, he or she is allowed to make the rejoinder before a minister makes a contribution breaking into the order of speakers.
 
Article 6.22.3 Concurrence
Irrespective of the order of speakers, a member may indicate his or her concurrence with a preceding speaker in the course of the deliberation of an issue without stating his or her reasons.
 

[Part 5]  Special Debates

 
Article 23 Specially-Arranged Debates
After conferring with the group leaders, the Speaker may determine that a debate takes place at a meeting of the Chamber on matters unconnected with other business under consideration. Such a debate may be restricted to one particular subject or may be divided up according to subject.
 
Article 6.23.1 Time for Contributions at a Specially-Arranged Debate
After conferring with the group leaders, the Speaker determines the duration of contributions at a specially-arranged debate.
 

[Part 6]  General Provisions

 
Article 24 Records
(1) A verbatim record is kept of proceedings in the Chamber. No one may speak off the record. A decision may not be altered when the record has been confirmed.
(2) The record of meetings of the Chamber and associated documents is made publicly available, unless secrecy is required.
 
Article 6.24.1 Preliminary Record
(1) A statement made at a meeting is made available in readable form without delay (preliminary record). If the speaker has registered no complaint against the preliminary record by 12 noon of the third working day following the meeting, he or she is presumed to have approved it.
(2) If the speaker adjusts the preliminary record, he or she should sign the adjustment.
 
Article 6.24.2 Confirmation of the Record
(1) A record is confirmed by the Chamber within three weeks of the meeting. A record which cannot be confirmed within that period is confirmed within one month or at such time as the Speaker determines.
(2) When a record is confirmed, a member is entitled to request correction of the record in respect of a statement which has been approved by another member under 6.24.1.
 
Article 25 Seats in the Chamber
Each member has his or her own appointed place in the Chamber. Special places are also provided for the Speaker, Deputy Speakers and ministers.
 
Article 6.25.1 Placing in the Chamber
Members sit in order of constituency in the Chamber.
 
Article 6.25.2 Place for Speaking in the Chamber
A speaker addresses the Chamber from the rostrum or from his or her place in the Chamber.
 
Article 26 The Public
Special places are provided in the Chamber for the general public.
 
Article 6.26.1 Rules for Visitors
(1) A visitor to the public gallery surrenders, on request, his or her outdoor clothing, carrying bags, and any objects capable of being used to create a disturbance in the Chamber. A person who fails to comply with such a request may be refused admission to the public gallery. Personal possessions thus surrendered are stored in special accommodation for the duration of the visit.
(2) Rules concerning security controls are laid down in the Act on Security Controls in the Parliament (SFS 1988:144).
 
Art. 27 Members of the Public Who Create a Disturbance
A member of the public who creates a disturbance may be ejected immediately. In the event of disorder developing among the public, the Speaker may have all the members of the public ejected.
 

Chapter 7  The Parliament Committees and the Committee on European Union Affairs

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
--appointments (Articles 2--4);
--responsibilities of the Parliament committees and allocation of matters (Articles 5--11);
--EU business (Articles 12--14); and
--meetings (Articles 15--21).
 

[Part 1]  Appointments

 
Article 2 Parliament Committees
(1) The Parliament appoints from among its members, for each electoral period, a Committee on the Constitution, a Committee on Finance, a Committee on Taxation and as many other committees as are necessary for the work of the Parliament. The appointments apply for the duration of the electoral period.
(2) The Parliament may also appoint committees during the electoral period to serve no longer than the remainder of the electoral period.
 
Article 7.2.1 Appointment of Committees
The Parliament appoints the following fifteen committees not later than the eighth day following the first meeting of the Chamber in the electoral period of the Parliament in the order listed below:
1. a Committee on the Constitution;
2. a Committee on Finance;
3. a Committee on Taxation;
4. a Committee on Justice;
5. a Committee on Civil Affairs;
6. a Committee on Foreign Affairs;
7. a Committee on Defense;
8. a Committee on Social Insurance;
9. a Committee on Health and Welfare;
10. a Committee on Cultural Affairs;
11. a Committee on Education;
12. a Committee on Transport and Communications;
13. a Committee on Environment and Agriculture;
14. a Committee on Trade and Industry; and
15. a Committee on the Labour Market.
 
Article 7.2.2 Appointments of Additional Committees
If the Parliament appoints any additional committee, it indicates the committee's primary responsibilities.
 
Article 3 Committee on European Union Affairs
The Parliament appoints from among its members for each electoral period a Committee on European Union Affairs (Committee on EU Affairs) for consultation with the Government under Chapter 10, Article 10 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 4 Members of the Parliament Committees and the Committee on European Affairs
(1) The Parliament committees and the Committee on EU Affairs consist of an odd number of members, but no fewer than fifteen.
(2) At meetings of the Committee on EU Affairs, each party group represented on the Committee has the right to substitute for one member of the Committee a member of the Parliament committee whose field of responsibility is affected by the issues under consideration. This right does not, however, apply to a party group which already has a member or deputy member on the Committee who is also a member of the Parliament committee concerned.
 
Article 7.4.1 Decisions Regarding Number of Members
The number of members in the Parliament committees and Committee on EU Affairs is determined by the Parliament in response to a proposal from the Nominations Committee.
 

[Part 2]  Responsibilities of the Committees and Allocation of Matters

 
Article 5 Allocation of Matters between the Parliament Committees
(1) In addition to the provisions laid down in Articles 8, 9 and 10, the Parliament prescribes by means of a supplementary provision the principles according to which matters are allocated among the Parliament committees. Matters falling within the same subject area are referred to the same committee.
(2) The Parliament may, however, determine that there is a committee for the preparation of matters concerning legislation under Chapter 8, Article 2, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government, irrespective of subject area.
 
Article 7.5.1 Committees' Subject Areas
The appendix to this Act lays down the various subject areas for which the Parliament committees are responsible, in addition to those laid down in Articles 8, 9 and 10.
 
Article 6 Sharing of Matters between Parliament Committees
The Budget Bill may be shared between two or more Parliament committees. Other matters may be shared only where special grounds so warrant.
 
Article 7 Joint Committees
Two or more committees may decide to prepare a matter jointly through deputies on a joint committee.
 
Article 8 Responsibilities and Subject Areas of the Committee on The Constitution
(1) The Committee on the Constitution prepares matters concerning the fundamental laws and the Parliament Act.
(2) The Committee monitors the application in the Parliament of the principle of subsidiarity under Chapter 9, Article 20, paragraph two and report its observations to the Chamber once a year.
(3) Further provisions concerning the responsibilities of the Committee are laid down in the Instrument of Government and in this Act.
 
Article 9 Responsibilities and Subject Areas of the Committee on Finance
(1) The Committee on Finance prepares matters concerning:
1. general guidelines for economic policy and for the determination of the central government budget; and
2. the activities of the Bank of Sweden.
(2) The Committee also prepares proposals for decisions on the central government budget in accordance with Chapter 11, Article 18, paragraphs three and five. Furthermore, the Committee on Finance examines estimates of central government revenue and the central government annual report. The Committee coordinates the Parliament's decisions concerning the central government budget.
(3) Further provisions concerning the responsibilities of the Committee are laid down in the Instrument of Government and in this Act.
 
Article 10 Subject Areas of The Committee on Taxation
The Committee on Taxation prepares matters concerning central government and local government taxation.
 
Article 11 Departures from the Allocation of Matters
(1) The Parliament may depart from the principles thus established for the allocation of matters among committees, with the exception of Article 8, paragraph one, if this is deemed necessary in a particular case, having regard to the interdependence of different matters, the particular nature of a matter, or working conditions.
(2) Under the circumstances set out in paragraph one, a Parliament committee may transfer a matter to another Parliament committee, provided this committee consents. The committee transferring the matter may deliver an opinion in the matter to the receiving committee in conjunction with the transfer.
 

[Part 3]  EU Business

 
Article 12 Government's Deliberations with the Committees in Matters Concerning EU Business
(1) The Government deliberates with the committees in matters concerning European Union business decided by the committees.
(2) If requested by at least five members of a committee, the committee decides to hold deliberations with the Government under paragraph one. The committee may reject such a request if deliberation would delay consideration of the matter so as to cause serious detriment. In such a case, the committee enters in the record its reasons for rejecting the request.
 
Article 13 Committee's Obligation to Monitor EU Business
The committees monitor the work of the European Union within their respective subject areas.
 
Article 14 Government's Consultation with the Committee on EU Affairs
(1) The Government informs the Committee on EU Affairs of matters which are to be decided by the Council of the European Union. The Government also consults the Committee regarding the conduct of negotiations in the Council prior to decisions in the Council.
(2) The Government deliberates with the Committee on EU Affairs concerning other matters associated with the work of the European Union, if so requested by the Committee on special grounds.
(3) The Government consults the Committee prior to meetings and decisions of the European Council.
 

[Part 4]  Meetings

 
Article 15  Time of Meetings of the Parliament Committees and the Committee on EU Affairs
The Parliament committees and the Committee on EU Affairs convene as required by the work of the Parliament.
 
Article 7.15.1 Summons
(1) The Parliament committees and the Committee on EU Affairs convene for the first time within two days from their appointment in response to a summons from the Speaker. Thereafter, the Parliament committees and Committee on EU Affairs are convened by their chairs. The chair summons the members to a meeting if so requested by at least five members of the Parliament committee or Committee on EU Affairs.
(2) A summons is sent to all members and deputy members. The summons should be posted no later than 6 p.m. on the day prior to the meeting.
(3) The Committee on Finance is also convened by the Speaker in response to a request from the Government, for purposes under Chapter 9, Article 5 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 7.15.2 Head of Meeting Pending the Election of a Chair
Pending the election of a chair, the member from among those present who has been a member of the Parliament longest presides.
 
Article 7.15.3 Planning of Committee Meetings
If the committee has made a unanimous decision in advance, the committee may meet during a plenary meeting or an election in the Chamber. However, the committee may not hold such public meetings as are referred to in Article 17 concurrently with a plenary meeting or election in the Chamber.
 
Article 7.15.4 Records
A record is kept of meetings of the Parliament committees and meetings of the Committee on EU Affairs.
 
Article 7.15.5 Committee on EU Affairs
A legible record is kept at meetings of the Committee on EU Affairs.
 
Article 16 Meetings behind Closed Doors
The Parliament committees and the Committee on EU Affairs meet behind closed doors. The Parliament committees and the Committee on EU Affairs may permit a person other than a member, deputy member or official of the Committee also to be present at a meeting behind closed doors. At meetings of the Committee on EU Affairs and deliberations in the Parliament committees on EU business under Article 12, no decision is required for a minister or an official accompanying a minister to be present.
 
Article 17 Meetings That are Open to the Public
(1) A Parliament committee may decide that a meeting is open to the public, in respect of that part of it which relates to information-gathering or deliberations on EU business in accordance with Article 12.
(2) The Committee on EU Affairs may decide that a meeting is open to the public, in whole or in part.
(3) A representative of a central government authority is not obliged, during a public part of a meeting, to provide information which is subject to secrecy rules at the authority.
 
Article 7.17.1 Sound or Video Recordings at Meetings That are Open to the Public
Sound or video recordings may be made of a public part of a meeting of a Parliament committee or the Committee on EU Affairs unless otherwise decided by the Committee.
 
Article 18 The Public
Special seats are provided for the general public at a public part of a meeting of the Committee on EU Affairs.
 
Article 7.18.1 Rules for Visitors
(1) Visitors, on request, surrender their outdoor clothing, bags and any objects capable of being used to create a disturbance at the meeting. A person who fails to comply with such a request may be refused admission to the meeting. Personal possessions thus surrendered are stored in special accommodation for the duration of the visit.
(2) Rules concerning security controls are laid down in the Act on Security Controls in the Parliament (SFS 1988:144).
 
Article 19 Members of the Public Who Create a Disturbance
A member of the public who creates a disturbance may be ejected immediately. In the event of disorder developing among the public, the chair may have all the members of the public ejected.
 
Article 20 Duty of Confidentiality
No one who has attended a meeting of a Parliament committee or the Committee on EU Affairs may, without authority, disclose any matter which the Government, a Parliament committee or the Committee on EU Affairs has determined is kept secret, with regard to the security of the Realm or for any other reason of exceptional importance arising out of relations with another state or an international organization.
 
Article 21 Disqualification
No one may be present at a meeting of a committee when a matter is being deliberated which personally concerns himself or herself or a close associate.
 

Chapter 8  Interpellations and Questions to Ministers

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
-- interpellations (Articles 2--4);
-- written questions (Articles 5--7); and
-- Question Time (Article 8).
 

[Part 1]  Interpellations

 
Article 2 Contents of Interpellations
An interpellation is submitted in writing and addressed to a specific minister. It deals with a specific subject and includes a statement of motivation.
 
Article 3 Decisions Concerning Interpellations
(1) The Speaker determines whether an interpellation may be introduced. If the Speaker considers that an interpellation conflicts with fundamental law or with this Act, he or she refuses to allow the interpellation to be introduced, stating the reasons for the decision.
(2) If the Chamber requests nevertheless that the interpellation be introduced, the Speaker refers the matter to the Committee on the Constitution for decision. The Speaker allows the interpellation if the Committee has declared that it does not conflict with fundamental law or with this Act.
 
Article 8.3.1. The Practical Handling of Interpellations
(1) An interpellation is submitted to the Parliament Administration. The Speaker notifies a meeting of the Chamber without delay of his or her decision whether or not to allow the interpellation to be introduced. If the Speaker allows the interpellation to be introduced, he or she forwards it to the minister without delay.
(2) The interpellation is entered in the record of proceedings in the Chamber.
 
Article 8.3.2. Withdrawal of Interpellations
An interpellation may be withdrawn until such time as the minister has given a reply.
 
Article 4 Replies to Interpellations
(1) An interpellation is answered by a minister within two weeks from its referral to the minister. If, as a result of the planning of the work of the Chamber, interpellations cannot be answered during a certain week, the period is extended until it is possible to deliver a reply. If no reply is given within the period indicated in paragraph one, or if no reply will be delivered, the minister informs the Chamber of his or her reasons for this. A statement of this nature may not give rise to a debate.
(2) An interpellation lapses if no reply is delivered during the electoral period in which it was introduced.
 
Article 8.4.1 Times for Delivery of Replies
(1) The Speaker determines the meeting at which a reply will be delivered, after conferring with the minister and the interpellant.
(2) A draft reply to an interpellation may be distributed to members in advance.
 
Article 8.4.2 Interpellation Debate
(1) An oral reply to an interpellation may be of no more than six minutes' duration. The minister is entitled to make three more contributions, of which the first two are of no more than four minutes' duration each, and the third of no more than two minutes' duration.
(2) The interpellant is entitled to make no more than three contributions, of which the first two are of no more than four minutes' duration each, and the third of no more than two minutes' duration.
(3) Other speakers are entitled to make no more than two contributions, of which the first is of no more than four minutes' duration, and the second of no more than two minutes' duration.
(4) A member informs the Chamber of his or her wish to speak no later than the second round of contributions.
 

[Part 2]  Written Questions

 
Article 5 Content of Written Questions
A written question to a minister may include a brief introductory explanation. The question deals with a specific subject.
 
Article 6 Decisions Concerning Written Questions
(1) The Speaker determines whether a written question may be introduced. If the Speaker considers that a written question conflicts with fundamental law or with this Act, he or she refuses to allow the question to be introduced, stating the reasons for the decision.
(2) If the Chamber requests nevertheless that the question be introduced, the Speaker refers the matter to the Committee on the Constitution for decision. The Speaker allows the question if the Committee has declared that it does not conflict with fundamental law or with this Act.
 
Article 8.6.1. The Practical Handling of Written Questions
(1) A written question is submitted to the Parliament Administration.
(2) The Speaker notifies a meeting of the Chamber without delay of his or her decision whether or not to allow the question to be introduced. If the Speaker allows the question to be introduced, he or she forwards it to the minister without delay.
 
Article 8.6.2. Withdrawal of Written Questions
A written question may be withdrawn until such time as the minister has given a reply.
 
Article 7 Replies to Written Questions
A written question receives a written reply from a minister. If no reply is delivered within the period specified in a supplementary provision, the minister informs the Parliament Administration of when the question will receive a reply or that no reply will be given.
 
Article 8.7.1 Deadline for Replies to Written Questions
A written question that is submitted no later than 10 a.m. on Thursday receives a reply no later than 12 noon on the following Wednesday. Should the work situation of the Parliament so require, the Speaker may determine, after conferring with the group leaders, that the reply is instead given within fourteen days after the question was submitted. The written reply is submitted to the Parliament Administration, which forwards it to the member who submitted the question.
 
Article 8.7.2 Record of Written Questions and Replies
Written questions and ministers' replies to questions are entered in the record of proceedings in the Chamber.
 

[Part 3]  Question Time

 
Article 8 Oral Questions
(1) An oral question to a minister is put forward at a special Question Time in the Chamber. The question deals with a specific subject.
(2) It receives an immediate reply from a minister.
(3) The Speaker determines who has the floor at Question Time and may decide to limit contributions to no more than one minute.
 
Article 8.8.1 Planning of Question Time
(1) Question Time is held every Thursday in weeks in which the Chamber meets.
(2) Should the work situation of the Parliament so require, the Speaker may determine that Question Time is held on some other day than Thursday or that it is cancelled.
(3) The Government Offices inform the Parliament Administration in good time which ministers will be attending Question Time. Notice to this effect is given in the manner determined by the Speaker.
 

Chapter 9  Introduction of Business

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
- business introduced by the Government (Articles 2--9);
- business introduced by members of the Parliament (Articles 10--15);
- business introduced by Parliament bodies (Articles 16--19);
- business introduced by means of documents from the EU (Article 20);
- information about the EU (Articles 21--23);
- other issues to be dealt with by the Parliament (Articles 24 and 25); and
- certain general issues (Articles 26 and 27).
 

[Part 1]  Business Introduced by the Government

 
Article 2 Government Bills
(1) The Government submits a proposal to the Parliament in the form of a Government bill.
(2) A Government bill includes the Government minutes in the matter, an account of the preparation of the matter and the reasons for the proposal. Bills containing proposals for legislation include the opinion of the Council on Legislation, if such exists.
 
Article 9.2.1 Submission of Government Bills
A Government bill is submitted to the Parliament Administration. It is notified at a meeting of the Chamber after having been made available to members.
 
Article 3 Times for Submissions of Bills
(1) In response to a proposal from the Speaker, the Parliament determines the latest date on which bills which, in the Government's view, should be considered during the current electoral period may be submitted. If a particular date is prescribed in this Act, that date however applies.
(2) A decision under paragraph one does not apply:
1. If, pursuant to law, the Government seeks the approval of the Parliament for a statutory instrument which has already been issued; or
2. If the Government considers that exceptional grounds exist for submitting a bill at a later date.
 
Article 4 Conferral in Order to Prevent Accumulation of Business
The Government should time the submission of its bills so as to prevent an accumulation of business in the Parliament. The Government confers with the Speaker in this connection.
 
Article 5 The Budget Bill
(1) The Government submits a bill setting out proposals for central government revenue and expenditure for the budget year (Budget Bill). The central government budget year coincides with the calendar year.
(2) The Budget Bill contains a budget statement and a budget proposal. Unless otherwise decided by the Parliament by law, under Chapter 11, Article 18, the Budget Bill includes an allocation of appropriations to the expenditure areas that have been determined.
(3) A bill relating to central government revenue or expenditure for the coming budget year may be submitted subsequent to the Budget Bill only if the Government considers that exceptional economic policy grounds exist for such action.
(4) A bill containing proposals for a new or significantly increased appropriation, or guidelines under Chapter 9, Article 6 of the Instrument of Government for central government activities covering a period exceeding that to which the appropriation for the activity relates, should contain an estimate of future costs connected with the activity to which the proposal relates. If a proposal concerning an appropriation is based on a plan covering a period exceeding the period for which the appropriation has been calculated in the bill, the plan should be described.
 
Article 9.5.1 Submission of the Budget Bill
The Budget Bill is submitted no later than 20 September. In years in which an election to the Parliament is held in September, the Budget Bill is instead submitted no later than two weeks after the opening of the Parliament session. If this is impossible due to a change of Government, the Budget Bill is submitted within three weeks from the date on which a new Government takes office, but no later than 15 November.
 
Article 9.5.2 Spring Fiscal Policy Bill
The Government submits a bill no later than 15 April each year setting out proposals for guidelines for future economic and budgetary policy (the Spring Fiscal Policy Bill).
 
Article 9.5.3 Expenditure Areas
(1) State expenditure is referred to the following expenditure areas: 1 Governance; 2 Economy and financial administration; 3 Taxes, customs and enforcement; 4 Justice; 5 International cooperation; 6 Defense and contingency measures; 7 International development cooperation; 8 Migration; 9 Health and medical care, social services; 10 Financial security for the sick and disabled; 11 Financial security for the elderly; 12 Financial security for families and children; 13 Integration and gender equality; 14 The labour market and working life; 15 Financial support for students; 16 Education and academic research; 17 Culture, media, religious communities, leisure; 18 Community planning, housing provision, construction and consumer policy; 19 Regional development; 20 General environmental protection and nature conservation; 21 Energy; 22 Transport and communications; 23 Agricultural sciences, rural areas and food; 24 Industry and trade; 25 General grants to local government; 26 Interest on central government debt, etc.; and 27 The contribution to the European Union.
(2) Decisions relating to the purposes and activities to be included in an expenditure area are taken in conjunction with decisions relating to the Spring Fiscal Policy Bill.
 
Article 9.5.4 Further Provisions on the Budget Process
Further provisions concerning the budget process are laid down in the Swedish Budget Act (2011:203).
 
Article 6 Government Bills with Proposals for Amendments to the Central Government Budget
(1) With the exceptions laid down in paragraph two, the Government may submit a bill with proposals for amendments to the central government budget at the most on two occasions during the budget year.
(2) Bills with proposals for amendments to the central government budget may only be submitted on other occasions if the Government finds special grounds for doing so.
 
Article 9.6.1 Submission of Government Bills with Proposals for Amendments to the Central Government Budget
Such bills as are referred to in Article 6, paragraph one are submitted in connection with the Budget Bill or the Spring Fiscal Policy Bill.
 
Article 7 Written Communications
The Government may submit information to the Parliament in the form of written communications.
 
Article 9.7.1 Submission of Written Communications
A written communication from the Government is submitted to the Parliament Administration. It is notified at a meeting of the Chamber after having been made available to members.
 
Article 8 Written Communications about Measures Taken in Response to Parliament Decisions
Each year the Government submits to the Parliament a written communication presenting the measures taken by the Government in response to communications submitted by the Parliament to the Government.
 
Article 9 Written Communication Concerning the Work of Commissions Appointed by Government Decision
The Government reports to the Parliament in a written communication submitted each year concerning the work of the commissions appointed by Government decision.
 

[Part 2]  Business Introduced by Members

 
Article 10 Private Member's Motions
Members of the Parliament submit proposals to the Parliament in the form of private members' motions. Proposals on matters of varying nature are not combined in one and the same private member's motion.
 
Article 9.10.1 Submission of Private Members' Motions
(1) A private member's motion is submitted to the Parliament Administration no later than 4.30 p.m. on the last day on which motions may be submitted. It should indicate the party to which the member submitting the motion belongs.
(2) Private members' motions are notified at a meeting of the Chamber.
 
Article 11 General Private Members' Motions Period
(1) Once a year, private members' motions may be introduced on any question falling within the jurisdiction of the Parliament (the general private members' motions period).
(2) Unless otherwise determined by the Parliament in response to a proposal from the Speaker, the general private members' motions period runs from the start of a Parliament session which opens in August, September or October, and continues as long as private members' motions may be introduced on account of the Budget Bill.
 
Article 12 Private Members' Motions Arising out of Government Bills etc.
Private members' motions arising out of a Government bill, a written communication from the Government, a submission or a report from a Parliament body other than a committee may be introduced within fifteen days from the date on which the matter was notified to the Chamber.
 
Article 13 Amended Period during Which Private Members' Motions May be Introduced
(1) If a bill or submission must be dealt with promptly, the Parliament may, if it finds that there are exceptional grounds for so doing, decide to curtail the period during which private members' motions may be introduced, in response to a proposal from the Government or the Parliament body which made the submission.
(2) If there are special grounds, the Parliament may decide, in response to a proposal from the Speaker, to extend the period during which private members' motions may be introduced.
 
Article 9.13.1 Proposal to Extend the Period during Which Private Members' Motions May be Introduced
A proposal to extend the period during which private members' motions may be introduced must be submitted not later than the second meeting following the meeting at which the bill, written communication, submission or report was notified to the Chamber. A decision in favor of an extension is taken no later than the next following meeting.
 
Article 14 Private Members' Motions Arising out of a Deferral
If consideration of a Government bill, a written communication from the Government or a submission or report has been deferred from one electoral period to the next, private members' motions arising therefrom may be introduced within seven days from the start of the new electoral period.
 
Article 15 Private Members' Motions Arising out of an Occurrence of Major Significance
Private members' motions arising out of an occurrence of major significance may be introduced jointly be at least ten members, if the event could not have been foreseen or taken into account during the general private members' motions period or any other period for the introduction of private members' motions set out in this Chapter.
 

[Part 3]  Business Introduced by Parliament Bodies

 
Article 16 Committee Initiatives
(1) A Parliament committee is entitled to introduce proposals in the Parliament on any subject falling within its remit (committee initiative). A committee initiative takes the form of a committee report, in accordance with the provisions that apply to committee reports in general.
(2) The Committee on Finance is entitled, for purposes of economic policy, to introduce proposals in the Parliament also on a matter falling within the remit of another committee.
 
Article 17 Submissions and Reports from Parliament Bodies
(1) The Parliament Board, the General Council and Executive Board of the Parliament, the Parliamentary Ombudsmen and the National Audit Office may make submissions to the Parliament in matters affecting the competence, organization, personnel or working procedures of the body concerned.
(2) The Parliament may prescribe that the Parliament Board, the General Council and Executive Board of the Bank of Sweden and the Parliamentary Ombudsmen may make submissions to the Parliament also in other cases.
(3) Special provisions concerning reports to the Parliament from a Parliament body are laid down in law. The provisions of paragraph one apply also to each individual Auditor General at the National Audit Office. Further provisions concerning such submissions are laid down in law.
 
Article 9.17.1 Submission of Submissions or Reports
A submission or report from a Parliament body is submitted to the Parliament Administration. It is notified at a meeting of the Chamber after having been made available to members.
 
Article 9.17.2 Submissions from the Parliament Board
(1)The Parliament Board may make submissions to the Parliament on issues concerning the conduct of Parliament business, issues coming within the Board's remit or concerning economic-administrative legislation relating to the Parliament Administration, Parliamentary Ombudsmen or the National Audit Office.
(2) Before the Parliament Board makes a submission concerning economic-administrative legislation relating to the Parliament Administration, Parliamentary Ombudsmen or the National Audit Office, the authorities concerned are given the opportunity to comment on the matter.
(3) The Board may also in other cases make submissions to the Parliament on issues concerning the Parliament or Parliament bodies, if the submissions are based on proposals emanating from commissions appointed by the Board on instructions from the Parliament.
 
Article 9.17.3 Reports about Measures Taken in Response to Parliament Decisions
Each year the Parliament Board submits to the Parliament a written communication presenting the measures taken by the Board in response to communications from the Parliament submitted to the Board.
 
Article 9.17.4 Submissions from the General Council and Executive Board of the Parliament
The General Council and Executive Board of the Bank of Sweden may make submissions to the Parliament within their areas of competence.
 
Article 9.17.5 Submission from the Parliamentary Ombudsmen
Each individual Parliamentary Ombudsman may make submissions to the Parliament on account of an issue which has arisen in their supervisory activities. Further provisions concerning such submissions are laid down in the Act with Instructions for the Parliamentary Ombudsmen (1986:765).
 
Article 9.17.6 Reports from the Auditors General
Each individual Auditor General may submit reports to the Parliament on account of the audit statements relating to the annual report of central government, the Bank of Sweden and the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation.
 
Article 18 Audit Reports from the Auditors General
(1) Each individual Auditor General submits his or her audit reports on the performance audit to the Parliament. The Auditors General submit the annual report with the most significant observations from the performance audits and the annual report to the Parliament.
(2) The reports are submitted to the Parliament Administration. They are notified at a meeting of the Chamber after having been made available to members.
(3) The annual reports and audit reports relating to the activities of the Parliament Administration and public authorities under the Parliament are submitted in the form of a report.
(4) Other reports are submitted by the Speaker to the Government or the Parliament committee concerned.
 
Article 19 Written Communications from the Government Arising out of Reports from the Auditors General
(1) The Government submits a written communication to the Parliament for each audit report submitted to the Government, giving an account of the measures the Government has taken or intends to take in response to the observations of the report. If the Government has taken or intends to take similar measures in response to several audit reports, however, the Government may submit a written communication covering several audit reports to the Parliament.
(2) The written communication from the Government is submitted to the Parliament within four months of the Government receiving the report. When calculating the respite, July and August are not counted.
 

[Part 4]  Business Introduced by Means of Documents from the EU

 
Article 20 EU Business
(1) Green and white papers that are forwarded to the Parliament by the European Commission are considered by the Parliament. The same applies to other documents from the European Union, other than draft legislative acts, whose consideration in this manner are determined by the Speaker, after consultation with the group leaders.
(2) The Parliament examines whether draft legislative acts conflict with the principle of subsidiarity. The Parliament approves or rejects initiatives from the European Council to decide on an authorization for the Council to amend the decision-making procedure in a particular area or in a particular case from unanimity to a qualified majority or from a special legislative procedure to the ordinary legislative procedure. In the same manner, the Parliament approves or rejects proposals from the European Commission to specify aspects of family law that have cross-border consequences and that can be the subject of legislative acts adopted in accordance with the ordinary legislative procedure.
 

[Part 5]  Information about the EU

 
Article 21 Information from the Government about the Work of the EU
(1) In accordance with Chapter 10, Article 10 of the Instrument of Government, the Government keeps the Parliament continuously informed concerning developments within the framework of European Union cooperation.
(2) The Government accounts to the Parliament concerning its actions in the European Union and submits a written communication annually to the Parliament reporting activities in the European Union.
 
Article 22 Information from the Government about Document from the EU
The Government informs the Parliament of its position regarding the documents put forward by the institutions of the European Union to the Parliament and which the Government deems significant.
 
Article 23 Information about the Work of the European Union from the Union's Institutions
The Parliament receives written information about work in the European Union from the Union's institutions in accordance with treaties and the protocols to the treaties.
 

[Part 6]  Other Business Dealt with by the Parliament

 
Article 24 Notifications of Decisions Held in Abeyance and Exceptions from a Respite
(1) The Committee on the Constitution notifies to the Chamber for final approval decisions on matters of fundamental law or relating to the Parliament Act which have been held in abeyance over an election. If, under provisions of the Instrument of Government, the procedure laid down for the amendment of fundamental law or of the Parliament Act is applied in any other case, the decision which is being held in abeyance is notified by the committee within whose remit the matter falls.
(2) The Committee on the Constitution furthermore notifies the Chamber of a decision concerning an exception from the respite prescribed for the introduction of a proposal which is taken in accordance with the procedure laid down in Chapter 8, Article 14 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 25 Motions Calling for a Referendum on a Matter of Fundamental Law or for a Declaration of No Confidence
A motion calling for a referendum on a matter of fundamental law or for a declaration of no confidence is put forward at a meeting of the Chamber. The motion is submitted in writing as soon as it has been put forward.
 

[Part 7]  Certain General Issues

 
Article 26 Withdrawals
(1) A Government bill, written communication from the Government, submission, report or private member's motion may be withdrawn until such time as a committee report has been presented on the matter. A draft law held in abeyance for a minimum of twelve months under Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government may be withdrawn until a new committee report has been presented under Chapter 10, Article 6, paragraph three of this Act. If a Government bill, written communication, submission or report has been withdrawn, private members' motions arising out of these documents lapse.
(2) If a Government bill, written communication, submission or report has been withdrawn, private members' motions arising out of the withdrawal may be introduced within seven days from the date on which the withdrawal was notified to the Chamber.
 
Article 9.26.1 Handling of Withdrawal
(1) Withdrawal of a Government bill, written communication, submission or report take the form of a written communication which is submitted to the Parliament Administration.
(2) A withdrawal of a private member's motion is submitted in writing to the Parliament Administration. The Speaker cancels Government bills, written communications, submissions, reports and private members' motions which have been withdrawn, or which have lapsed as a result of a withdrawal. The Speaker's decision is notified to the Chamber.
 
Article 27 Calculation of Statutory Time Limits
The provisions generally applying to the calculation of statutory time limits applies also to time limits within which action is taken under a provision of this Chapter.
 

Chapter 10  Preparation of Business

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on the Parliament committees' preparation and consideration of business.
 
Article 2 Mandatory Preparation of Business and Tabling
(1) Government bills, written communications from the Government, submissions, reports from a Parliament body other than a committee, private members' motions and EU documents indicated in Chapter 9, Article 20 are referred by the Chamber to a committee for preparation. The same applies to applications under Chapter 5, Article 7, for consent to prosecution or deprivation of liberty which have been notified in the Chamber.
(2) Before a matter is referred to a committee for preparation, it is tabled at a meeting of the Chamber, unless the Chamber decides on immediate referral.
 
Article 3 Mandatory Consideration of Business
(1) The committees deliver reports to the Chamber on Government bills, written communications from the Government, submissions, reports from a Parliament body other than a committee and private members' motions which have been referred to them, or have been submitted from another committee.
(2) The committees deliver statements on the EU documents indicated in Chapter 9, Article 20, paragraphs one and three and which have been referred to them or have been submitted from another committee.
(3) Concerning matters relating to subsidiarity under Chapter 9, Article 20, paragraph two, if a committee considers that the draft conflicts with the principle of subsidiarity, it delivers a statement to the Chamber with a proposal that the Parliament should send a reasoned opinion to the Presidents of the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission. The committee also delivers a statement to the Chamber if no fewer than five members of the committee so request. Otherwise the Committee is to report to the Chamber by means of an extract from the record that the draft legislation does not conflict with the principle of subsidiarity.
Article 4 Preparation of Matters Arising in the Parliament
(1) Before a committee either completely or partially supports a motion that the Parliament should approve a law, or raises such a proposal through a committee initiative, the committee should gather all the necessary information and comments, provided there are no exceptional reasons against doing so. This also applies to proposals affecting the central government budget. If the committee has not gathered information or comments, the committee gives in its committee report reasons for this.
(2) Before a committee either completely or partially supports a motion or raises a proposal through a committee initiative, the Committee on Finance is given the opportunity to give an opinion if the proposal can entail substantial future repercussions on public expenditures and revenues.
 
Article 5 Statement from the Council on Legislation
(1) Provisions concerning the committees' obligation to obtain the opinion of the Council on Legislation are laid down in Chapter 8, Article 21 of the Instrument of Government.
(2) If the committee has not obtained an opinion from the Council on Legislation, the committee gives in its committee report reasons for this.
(3) The Committee on the Constitution may provide an explanation to the effect that Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government is not applicable concerning a specific legislative proposal only after the Council on Legislation has submitted its comments.
 
Article 6 Consideration of Deferred Matters or Matters Held in Abeyance
(1) Committee reports on matters that have been deferred to the next electoral period in accordance with the provisions in Chapter 11, Articles 15, 16 and 20 are delivered by the committees appointed by the newly elected Parliament.
(2) When notifying the Chamber of a decision held in abeyance under Chapter 9, Article 24, a committee appends an opinion in the matter.
(3) If a draft law has been held in abeyance for a minimum of twelve months under Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government, the committee delivers a new report on the matter.
 
Article 10.6.1 Decisions by the Committee on Finance
A decision of the Committee on Finance on a question under Chapter 9, Article 5 of the Instrument of Government is reported to the Government in a written communication from the committee.
 
Article 7 Cooperation between Committees
A committee may give another committee the opportunity to state its opinion in a matter falling within the remit of another committee.
 
Article 8 Obligation of a State Authority to Furnish Information and Deliver Opinions to a Committee
(1) A central government authority furnishes information and deliver opinions to a committee that so requests, unless it follows otherwise from Chapter 7, Article 17, paragraph three. An authority which is not an authority under the Parliament may refer a request from a committee to the Government for decision.
(2) The Government's obligation under this Article to furnish information and deliver opinions to a committee is limited to both issues on work in the European Union, and audit reports on the performance audit from the Auditors General which have been submitted to the Government.
 
Article 9 Protection of Minorities in Committees
(1) A committee obtains information or an opinion under Articles 4, 7 or 8, if, during the consideration of a matter, at least five of its members so request. If the matter relates to European Union activities or such reports from the Auditors General as mentioned in Chapter 9, Article 18, such a request may be put forward unconnected with the consideration of a matter.
(2) If requested by at least five members of a committee, a committee that has been given the opportunity to state its opinion to another committee under Article 7 produces an opinion.
(3) The committee may reject a request for information or an opinion under the first or second paragraph, if it is put forward during the consideration of a matter and the committee concludes that the action requested would so delay consideration of the matter that serious detriment would result. The committee states in its report or opinion its reasons for rejecting such a request. If a request under the second paragraph has been rejected, the committee gives the reasons in its record.
 
Article 10  Information Necessary in Certain EU Matters
(1) When preparing a statement under Article 3, paragraph two, the committee obtains the necessary information from the Government.
(2) Within two weeks from the day the committee so requests, the Government informs the committee of its assessment regarding the application of the principle of subsidiarity to the current draft legislative act under Article 3, paragraph three.
 
Article 11 Voting at a Committee Meeting and the Right to Append a Reservation
(1) Voting in a committee is by open ballot. In the event of a tied vote, the opinion of the chair prevails.
(2) A member who loses a vote in a committee may append a reservation, with a motion, to the committee's report or statement. If the vote relates to the committee's position in a statement of opinion to another committee, the member may append a dissenting view to the statement of opinion. The report, statement or statement of opinion may not, however, be delayed as a result.
 
Article 12 Special Statements of Opinion
In a report, statement or opinion delivered to another committee, a member may explain his or her position in a special statement of opinion.
 

Chapter 11  Settlement of Business

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
-- necessary conditions for settlement of business (Articles 2--6);
--procedure for decisions in the Chamber (Articles 7--14);
-- when matters are to be settled (Articles 15--17);
-- special procedures for certain business (Articles 8--20);
-- communications on Parliament decisions (Article 21).
 

[Part 1]  Necessary Conditions for Settlement of Business

 
Article 2 Availability of Committee Reports and Statements
(1) A report or statement from a committee is available for members no later than two days before the matter in question is to be considered.
(2) The committee report is notified to the Chamber and tabled at a meeting before it is settled.
(3) The Parliament may decide, in response to a proposal from the committee or the Speaker, that the matter may be settled despite it having been available for less time than stated in the first paragraph.
 
Article 11.2.1 Time at which Committee Reports and Statements Are Made Available
The committee report or statement is available for members no later than 3 p.m. on the day stated in Article 2, paragraph one.
 
Article 11.2.2 Proposal for Settlement of a Matter that Has Been Available for a Shorter Time
A proposal under Article 2, paragraph three is notified to the Chamber in connection with the consideration of the report or statement. Before the Speaker raises such a proposal, he or she consults the chair and deputy chair of the committee.
 
Article 3 Tabling and Time for Settlement of Certain Matters
(1) A motion calling for a referendum on a matter of fundamental law or a declaration of no confidence is tabled at the meeting at which it is put forward and subsequently at one other meeting before it is settled. The matter is settled no later than the third meeting after the motion was put forward.
(2) A proposal from the Speaker for a new Prime Minister is tabled at the meeting at which it is put forward and then at one further meeting before it may be settled. The matter is, in accordance with the provisions in Chapter 6, Article 4, paragraph two of the Instrument of Government decided on the fourth day after the day the proposal was put forward.
 
Article 4 Introduction of Motions
(1) A committee moves adoption of a proposal in a matter by means of a committee report or statement.
(2) A member who wishes to move adoption or rejection of a proposal or proposed decision which is considered in a committee report or a statement introduces the motion during the deliberations.
 
Article 5 Referral Back and Referral to Another Committee
(1) A matter on which a committee has delivered a report or a statement is referred back to the committee by the Chamber for further preparation if at least one third of those voting concur in a motion to this effect. The same matter may not be referred back more than once under this Article.
(2) The Chamber may also refer the matter to another committee for further preparation. If a motion for referral to another committee and a motion for referral back to the same committee are put forward concurrently, the motion for referral back is considered first. If the motion for referral back is approved, the motion for referral to another committee lapses.
 
Article 6 Necessary Conditions for Settlement of Matters
(1) A matter under deliberation may not be taken up for settlement until the Chamber has declared the debate closed, in response to a proposal from the Speaker.
(2) A report or statement from a committee may be taken up for settlement only at a meeting which has been notified in the summons and entered in the order paper as a plenary meeting.
 

[Part 2]  Procedure for Decisions in the Chamber

 
Article 7 Putting Questions for Decision
(1) The Speaker puts the questions for decision, based on the motions which have been put forward during deliberations.
(2) If the Speaker considers that a motion conflicts with fundamental law or with this Act, he or she decides not to put the question, stating the reasons for the decision. If the Chamber requests the question be put, the matter is referred to the Committee on the Constitution for decision. If the committee has declared that a motion does not conflict with fundamental law or with this Act, the Speaker puts the question.
(3) The provisions set out in paragraph two concerning examination of the constitutionality of a motion may not apply to the question whether Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government is applicable to a particular draft law.
 
Article 8 Settlement
(1) A matter is settled by acclamation or, if a member so requests, by holding a vote.
(2) If a special procedure rule is to be applied under Article 14, the matter must always be settled by means of a vote.
(3) If necessary, settlement of a matter is divided up into separate part-decisions.
 
Article 9 Settlement by Acclamation
When a matter is to be settled by acclamation, the Speaker puts to the question the motions that have been put forward in the course of the deliberations, and which can be weighed up against each other. The question is worded in such a way that it can be answered with a Yes' or No'. The Speaker declares what he or she understands to be the result, and confirms the decision by striking his or her gavel, unless a member calls for a vote.
Article 10 Settlement by Means of a Vote
(1) When a matter is to be settled by means of a vote, the motions that have been put forward during the deliberations are weighed up against each other. The motion which in the Speaker's view has been adopted by acclamation, or the motion determined by the Speaker, constitutes the principal proposal for the vote. A second motion is put up against this principal proposal to act as a counter-proposal.
(2) If there is more than one motion which can be put up against the principal proposal, the Parliament first in one or more preparatory decisions determine which motion constitutes the counter- proposal in the main vote.
(3) Voting is by open ballot. Under the rule laid down in Chapter 4, Article 7 of the Instrument of Government, the proposal which obtains the support of more than half the members voting constitutes the decision of the Parliament, unless otherwise provided in the Instrument of Government or in this Act. The Speaker announces the result of the vote and confirms the decision by striking his or her gavel.
 
Article 11.10.1 Voting Procedure
(1) A vote is carried out at a previously established point in time or after due warning.
(2) When a vote is taken, the Speaker formulates the proposal on which the vote will be taken. If a special procedure rule under Article 14 is to be applied in a particular case, this is stated in the proposal put to the vote. The proposal which is to be put to the vote is read out and submitted to the Chamber for approval.
(3) The vote is taken electronically or, when this cannot be done, by means of a call of names.
 
Article 11.10.2 Counts of Votes when a Vote Is Taken Electronically
When a vote is taken electronically, the way each member votes is registered.
 
Article 11.10.3 Count of Votes when a Vote is Taken by Call of Names
When a vote is taken by means of a call of names, the Speaker calls upon two members to record the vote. The Deputy Speakers are called up first, followed by the other members according to constituency. Responses must be one of the following: Yes', No', Abstain'. When a vote is taken, the way each member votes is registered.
 
Article 11.10.4 Voting by Having the Members Rise in their Places
If the Speaker deems it appropriate, a vote may instead be taken by having the members rise in their places. If the result of such a vote is unclear or if a member calls for a count, a new vote is taken electronically or by means of a call of names.
 
Article 11.10.5 Procedure when a Vote is Taken by Having the Members Rise in their Places
When a vote is taken by having the members rise in their places, the Speaker calls first on those members wishing to vote Yes' to rise and calls thereafter on members wishing to vote No' to rise.
 
Article 11 A Tied Vote when a Preparatory Vote is Taken
If the vote is tied in a preparatory vote concerning which motion constitutes the counter-proposal, the outcome is determined by lot.
 
Article 12 A Tied Vote in a Principal Division
(1) If the vote is tied in a principal division, the matter is tabled in its entirety for a new vote to be decided on the next occasion a decision is to be taken.
(2) If the vote is tied at the next vote, the Speaker puts the proposal that the matter be referred back to the committee for further preparation. The matter is referred back if at least half of those voting concur. If the matter is not referred back, it is determined by lot.
(3) After the matter has been referred back, it is taken up again in its entirety for consideration. If the vote is tied in the principal division, the matter is determined by lot.
 
Article 13 Referral Back of a Legislative Matter Settled by Means of Part-Decisions
(1) If the settlement of a legislative matter has been divided up into two or more part-decisions, the Chamber may decide immediately, after the last part-decision, and in response to a proposal from the Speaker or from a member, that the matter is referred back to the committee for further preparation. If the Parliament decides to refer the matter back, the part-decisions are null and void.
(2) The same matter may not be referred back more than once under this Article.
 
Article 14 Settlement under a Special Procedure Rule
(1) If more than one proposal has been put forward for decisions, for which another procedure applies than for decisions in general, the Chamber first selects one of the proposals in accordance with the rules generally in force. A decision is taken thereafter as to whether the chosen proposal is adopted or rejected, in accordance with the procedure rule that applies to the proposal. This procedure is applied even when there are several measures of draft legislation which are mutually incompatible and a motion has been put forward for one of them to be held in abeyance for a minimum of twelve months under Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government.
(2) If two or more motions are put forward concurrently which call for a referendum on the same measure of fundamental law which is being held in abeyance over an election, or which call for a declaration of no confidence in respect of the same minister, only one vote is taken.
 

[Part 3]  When Matters Are to Be Settled

 
Article 15 Time Frame for Settlement of Matters
(1) A matter is settled in the electoral period in which it is introduced. The Parliament may, however, decide that consideration of the matter may be deferred to the first parliamentary session of the next electoral period.
(2) A matter relating to the central government budget for the next following budget year is settled before the start of the budget year, if settlement cannot be deferred without detriment to adoption of the central government budget.
 
Article 11.15.1 Decisions Concerning Deferral
A decision that the consideration of a matter may be deferred to the first parliamentary session of the next electoral period is taken by the Parliament as proposed by the relevant Parliament committee. The Parliament may also decide on deferral without any such proposal.
 
Article 16 Deferral with Settlement in Special Cases
A matter that is introduced during the period when the Chamber is not meeting that continues until the first parliamentary session of the next electoral period is regarded as being deferred to the first parliamentary session of the next electoral period. The same applies if the Chamber is not meeting as a result of a decision by the Speaker in connection with the calling of an extraordinary election.
 
Article 17 Final Settlement of a Matter Held in Abeyance over an Election
(1) A matter which has been held in abeyance over an election under the rules laid down in Chapter 8, Articles 14-17 of the Instrument of Government is settled at the first parliamentary session of the electoral period within which a final decision may first be taken under the rules, provided the matter has not already been rejected. The Parliament may decide to defer settlement to another parliamentary session. The matter is settled finally before the next ordinary election to the Parliament.
(2) In the case of deferral due to an extraordinary election, the rules laid down in Article 16, paragraph one are applied.If a proposal for an amendment of fundamental law held in abeyance over an election, or any other decision which is taken in accordance with the same procedure is rejected in a referendum, the relevant committee notifies the matter to the Chamber.
 
Article 11.17.1 Proposal for a Decision on Deferral of a Matter Held in Abeyance over an Election
A decision concerning deferral of a final decision on a matter held in abeyance over an election in accordance with the provisions in Article 17, paragraph one is taken on the basis of a proposal from the relevant committee.
 

[Part 4]  Special Procedures for Certain Matters

 
Article 18 Decisions Relating to the Central Government Budget
(1) Decisions relating to the central government budget are made in accordance with paragraphs two to five, unless otherwise laid down in law by the Parliament.
(2) The central government budget for the next following budget year is determined in two stages.
(3) In the first stage a single decision is taken to establish:
1. an estimate of revenues under the central government budget;
2. the highest figure to which the expenditure falling within each expenditure area may amount (expenditure limit);
3. an estimate of other payments that effect State borrowing requirements; and
4. decisions relating to the budget policy objectives decided on by the Parliament.
(4) After a decision has been taken under paragraph 3, a single decision is taken in a second stage to establish appropriations for each expenditure area as well as authorizations of financial commitments.
(5) Amendments to the central government budget are determined by means of a single decision. Only in the case of very extensive amendments are decisions taken in two stages, in accordance with paragraphs three and four.
 
Article 11.18.1 Preliminary Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure Limits
In the case of decisions under Section 18, paragraph three, preliminary estimates of revenue and expenditure limits are established for the second and third budget years thereafter.
 
Article 19 A Motion Calling for a Draft Law to Be Held in Abeyance
(1) A motion under Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government calling for a draft law to be held in abeyance for a minimum of twelve months may be put forward when the committee report on the draft law has been tabled.
(2) If at the same time a motion has been put forward under paragraph one and a motion that the proposal is rejected, the motion calling for the proposal to be rejected is examined before the proposal is put to a vote for immediate approval.
 
Article 11.19.1 A Motion Calling for a Draft Law to Be Held in Abeyance
A motion calling for a draft law to be held in abeyance for at least twelve months is put forward in writing.
 
Article 11.19.2 A Vote on Whether a Draft Law Is to Be Held in Abeyance
(1) If a motion has been put forward calling for a draft law to be held in abeyance for at least twelve months, and when put to the vote the majority necessary for immediate adoption is not obtained, the proposal is referred to the Committee on the Constitution for examination in accordance with Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph three of the Instrument of Government, provided the Committee on the Constitution has not already delivered an opinion on the matter.
(2) If the Committee on the Constitution has declared the procedure to be applicable, the Parliament reconsiders whether the proposal can be rejected or adopted immediately. In any other case the matter is referred back to the committee which prepared it.
 
Article 20 Settlement of Draft Law Held in Abeyance
(1) A draft law that has been held in abeyance for twelve months under Chapter 2, Article 22, paragraph one of the Instrument of Government is examined before the end of the following calendar year.
(2) If another draft law is closely connected with legislation held in abeyance under the first paragraph of the above mentioned provision, the Parliament may, on the basis of a proposal from the relevant committee, determine that it is settled within the time applying to the examination of the draft law held in abeyance.
(3) If a matter under this Article cannot be settled within the time prescribed due to the calling of an extraordinary election, it is settled as soon as possible after the newly-elected Parliament convenes.
 

[Part 5]  Notice of Parliament Decisions

 
Article 21 Written Communications from the Parliament
(1) If a Parliament decision calls for executive action, the body responsible for executing the decision is informed by means of a written communication. Parliament decisions on account of a Government bill or a submission are always communicated to the Government or the Parliament body putting forward the submission by means of a written communication.
(2) The Parliament informs the Presidents of the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission of its decision to provide a reasoned opinion concerning the principle of subsidiarity by means of a written communication.
(3) The Parliament informs the Presidents of the European Council, the Commission and the Council of its decision to reject an initiative or a proposal by means of a written communication in accordance with Chapter 9, Article 20, paragraph three.
 
Article 11.21.1 Signing of Written Communications from the Parliament
Written communications from the Parliament are signed by the Speaker.
 

Chapter 12  Elections in the Parliament

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
-- conditions for election and eligibility (Articles 2--5);
-- forms of election (Articles 6--10);
-- appeals (Articles 11 and 12);
-- what happens if an MP's period of service is terminated (Articles 13--15); and
-- elections in Parliament committees and other Parliament bodies (Articles 16 and 17).
 

[Part 1]  Conditions for Election and Eligibility

 
Article 2 Nominations Committee
Elections in the Parliament are prepared by a special Nominations Committee appointed from within the Parliament, unless otherwise prescribed.
 
Article 12.2.1 Elections not to Be Prepared by the Nominations Committee
The Nominations Committee does not prepare the election of a Regent, a Deputy Regent, a person who holds office as a Regent ad interim, the Speaker or the Deputy Speakers. Nor does the Nominations Committee prepare any election which according to any provision in this Act is prepared in accordance with a special procedure.
 
Article 12.2.2 Summons to Meetings
(1) The Nominations Committee meets the same day as it is appointed by the Speaker. Thereafter, the Nominations Committee meets when summoned by the Chair.
(2) The provisions in Chapter 7, Article 16, supplementary provisions 7.15.1, paragraph two and 7.15.2--7.15.4 are also applied to the Nominations Committee.
 
Article 3 Requirement for Swedish Citizenship
Only a Swedish citizen may hold a post appointed by election of the Parliament.
 
Article 4 Obligation to Remain in Service
A person elected to such a post may not leave it without the Parliament's consent.
 
Article 5 Times and Validity of Elections
An election relating to a period corresponding to the electoral period of the Parliament is held as soon as possible after the start of the electoral period and be valid until the Parliament holds a new election in the next electoral period, unless otherwise prescribed.
 

[Part 2]  Form of Election

 
Article 6 Election of Incumbent of a Particular Post
(1) If the incumbent of a particular post is to be elected separately, the election is held by acclamation.
(2) The election is held by secret ballot, however, if a member so requests. If only one person is to be elected, that person is elected who obtains the most votes, unless otherwise prescribed in this Act. In the event of a tied vote, the election is decided by lot. Provisions on the procedure for election by secret ballot are to be found in supplementary provisions.
(3) If the body or group responsible for preparing the election has put forward a unanimous proposal, the election by secret ballot is not held until a later meeting.
 
Article 7 Election of Several Persons on an Agreed List
(1) At elections of two or more persons, the Nominations Committee may present an agreed list. The list contains as many names as there are persons to be elected and is approved by all the members participating in the meeting of the Nominations Committee or by all save one. The Speaker presents the agreed list to the Chamber and, if it is adopted, declare the persons listed to be elected.
(2) Election is by secret ballot, if so requested by at least as many members as correspond to the figure obtained if the sum total of members entitled to vote is divided by the number of persons to whom the election relates, increased by one. If the figure obtained is not a whole number, it is rounded up to the next higher whole number. This election is held at a later meeting.
 
Article 8 Election by Secret Ballot
(1) Elections are held by secret ballot unless otherwise prescribed in Article 6 or 7 or some other principal provision of this Act.
(2) If two or more persons are to be elected by means of secret ballot, the seats are distributed proportionately among all the groups of Parliament members participating under a particular designation in the election (proportional election).
(3) The seats are distributed between the groups by allocating them one by one to the group with the highest comparison figure on each occasion. The comparison figure is identical with the number of votes obtained by the group as long as it has not been allocated a seat. The comparison figure is calculated thereafter by dividing the votes obtained by the group by the number of seats the group has already been allocated, increased by one. When the comparison figures are tied, the matter is decided by lot.
 
Article 12.8.1 Procedure for Election by Secret Ballot
(1) At an election by secret ballot, the Speaker calls upon three members to assist at the opening and examination of the ballot papers and two to record the votes.
(2) The members are called up in the manner prescribed in supplementary provision 11.10.3 and hand their ballot paper to the Speaker.
(3) When all the ballot papers found to be valid have been read out by the Speaker and have been recorded by the Clerk of the Chamber and the two members, their notes are compared.
(4) The Speaker establishes the result of the election and announces it to the Chamber.
 
Article 12.8.2 Procedure for Several Elections by Secret Ballot
If two or more elections are to be held by secret ballot, the Speaker may determine that the ballot papers for all the elections are delivered before a count is taken in any of the elections, unless otherwise requested by a member.
 
Article 12.8.3 The Form of Ballot Papers and when they Are Invalid
(1) Ballot papers are single sheets, folded and unmarked, and are identical in size, material and color. They may include information concerning the election to which they apply.
(2) A ballot paper is invalid if it carries any distinguishing mark clearly placed upon it with deliberate intent.
(3) If a member submits more than one ballot paper in an election, these ballot papers are invalid. If, however, the ballot papers are identical in content, one ballot paper is deemed valid in the count.
 
Article 12.8.4 Ballot Papers at Proportional Elections
(1) At a proportional election, the ballot paper designates in words a particular group of Parliament members. The names are listed consecutively, one after the other, following this designation.
(2) A ballot paper is invalid if it:
1) lacks a designation of a member's group;
2) carries more than one such designation; or
3) lacks the name of an eligible candidate. name on a ballot paper is regarded as null and void if:
1) the candidate is not eligible;
2) the name has been crossed out;
3) it is not clear who is intended; or
4) the order of precedence between that name and another name on the ballot paper is not clearly apparent.
(3) The order of precedence between candidates' names in each members' group is determined by calculating comparison figures for the candidates applying the method laid down in Chapter 14, Article 10 of the Elections Act (SFS 2005:837). If several candidates obtain the same comparison figure, the election is decided by lot.
 
Article 12.8.5 Ballot Papers for the Election of one Person
(1) When one person is to be elected, there is one name on the ballot paper.
(2) A ballot paper is invalid if:
1) it contains the names of two or more candidates;
2) it contains the name of a candidate who is not eligible;
3) the name has been crossed out;
4) it is not clear who is intended; or
5) it contains the designation of a group of members of the Parliament.
 
Article 9 Election of Deputy Members
(1) If two or more persons are to be elected, at least as many deputy members as there are ordinary members are also elected, unless otherwise prescribed. The provisions relating to the election of ordinary members apply also to elections of deputy members.
(2) After election for a Parliament body, the Parliament may approve a change in the number of deputy members, provided the deputy members are no fewer in number than the ordinary members.
(3) An alternate member of the Parliament who has been summoned to take up duty may be appointed a deputy member of a committee of which the absent member is a member, without increasing the number of deputy members of the committee. In such a case, the procedure laid down in Article 14 still applies.
 
Article 12.9.1 Election of an Increased Number of Deputy Members
Matters concerning the election of an increased number of deputy members that exceeds the number originally elected are prepared by the Nominations Committee. Elections of deputy members necessitated by an increase in the number of deputy members are held as soon as possible.
 
Article 12.9.2 Number of Deputy Members
The same number of deputy members is appointed as there are ordinary members, unless otherwise prescribed or specially determined.
 
Article 10 Attendance by Deputy Members
An elected member of a Parliament body is replaced in his or her absence by a deputy member belonging to the same party group, unless otherwise prescribed. If this is not possible, deputy members have precedence in the order in which they were elected, or, if the election was held using an agreed list, in the order in which their names were listed.
 

[Part 3]  Appeals

 
Article 11 Appeals against Elections by Secret Ballot
Appeals against elections by secret ballot may be lodged by a member of the Parliament with the Election Review Board. The election is valid irrespective of any appeal.
 
Article 12.11.1 Procedures for Appeals
(1) An appeal is made in writing and be addressed to the Election Review Board, but it is submitted to the Parliament Administration. The appeal is submitted to the Parliament Administration within five days from the day on which the result of the election was announced in the Chamber.
(2) When the appeal period has expired, the Speaker notifies a meeting of the Chamber of all the appeals received. The Speaker determines when comments concerning the appeals may be submitted to the Election Review Board.
(3) When the period during which comments may be submitted has expired, the Speaker forwards the appeal documents to the Election Review Board immediately. The Speaker should submit promptly to the Election Review Board his or her own opinion concerning the appeals.
 
Article 12.11.2 Decision by the Election Review Board
(1) If it finds in its examination of an appeal that a provision of Article 6, paragraph two or of supplementary provisions 12.8.1 to 12.8.5 has been set aside in the election, the Election Review Board declares an election null and void and order a re-election.
(2) A re-election however is ordered only if it can be assumed with justification that what occurred has affected the result of the election.
(3) If the error can be rectified by means of a recount or any other less radical measure, the Election Review Board instead directs the Speaker to effect the necessary rectification.
 
Article 12.11.3 Storage of Ballot Papers, etc.
Ballot papers and other election material are held in safe keeping until the election result takes effect.
 
Article 12 Re-Election after Appeal
If a new member has taken his or her seat in the Parliament due to the revision of a Parliament election result on appeal, elections held by the Parliament earlier in the electoral period are held again if so requested by at least ten members of the Parliament.
 

[Part 4]  What Happens if the Appointment as a Member of the Parliament Terminates

 
Article 13 Ineligibility
A person elected by the Chamber to a post for which membership of the Parliament is a prerequisite resigns the appointment if he or she leaves the Parliament or is appointed Speaker of the Parliament or a minister, unless otherwise prescribed.
 
Article 14 Election of Successor to a Body
If a person who has been elected to a body which at the start of the electoral period was appointed by means of an election of two or more persons resigns his or her appointment ahead of time, the party group or groups for which he or she was elected notifies the Speaker of the name of a successor. The Speaker declares the person nominated as a successor to be elected. If no name is put forward, or if more than one person is nominated, the Speaker appoints a successor.
 
Article 15 Supplementary Election
If a seat becomes vacant ahead of time and the original election related to only one person, an election is held for the remaining period. The same procedure is applied for a supplementary election as for the original election.
 

[Part 5]  Elections in Parliamentary Committees and other Parliament Bodies

 
Article 16 Election of Chair to a Parliament Body
A body whose members are appointed by the Parliament in whole or in part elects from among its members a chair and one or more deputy chairs, unless otherwise prescribed.
 
Article 17 Elections within Parliament Bodies
Elections within a body under Article 16 are held by acclamation or by secret ballot, if a member so requests. In the event of a tied vote, the election is decided by lot.
 
Article 12.17.1 The Form of Ballot Papers
Ballot papers are single sheets, folded and unmarked, and are identical in size, material and color.
 

Chapter 13  Parliament Bodies and Boards

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
-- the Parliamentary Ombudsmen (Articles 2--4);
-- the National Audit Office (Articles 5--8);
-- the Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs and the War Delegation (Articles 9--12);
-- boards (Articles 13--17);
-- delegations to international organizations (Articles 18 and 19);
-- other assignments appointed by election in the Parliament (Articles 20--23); and
-- prosecution (Article 24).
 

[Part 1]  The Parliamentary Ombudsmen

 
Article 2 Organization and Responsibilities of the Parliamentary Ombudsman
(1) The Parliament elects Ombudsmen under Chapter 13, Article 6 of the Instrument of Government to supervise the application of laws and other statutes in public activities.
(2) The Parliamentary Ombudsmen are four in number, one Chief Parliamentary Ombudsman and three Parliamentary Ombudsmen. The Chief Parliamentary Ombudsman acts as administrative director and determines the main focus of the Ombudsmen's activities. The Parliament may in addition elect one or more Deputy Ombudsmen. A Deputy Ombudsman has held office previously as a Parliamentary Ombudsman.
 
Article 13.2.1 The Committee on the Constitution's Conferral with the Ombudsman
The Committee on the Constitution confers with a Parliamentary Ombudsman on working procedures and other matters of an organizational nature, either on its own initiative, or at the request of one of the Parliamentary Ombudsmen.
 
Article 3 Election of Ombudsman
(1) The Parliamentary Ombudsmen and Deputy Ombudsmen are elected individually. When an Ombudsman is elected by secret ballot, the same procedure is applied as for the election of Speakers.
(2) A Parliamentary Ombudsman is elected for the period from the date of his or her election, or a later date as determined by the Parliament, until a new election has been held in the fourth year thereafter and the person then elected has assumed office. The election is never valid beyond
the end of that year.
(3) A Deputy Ombudsman is elected for a period of two years from the date of his or her election, or a later date determined by the Parliament.
 
Article 13.3.1 Preparation of Election of Ombudsman
The Committee on the Constitution prepares the election of the Parliamentary Ombudsmen or Deputy Ombudsmen.
 
Article 4 Removal from Office of Ombudsman
(1) In response to a proposal from the Committee on the Constitution, the Parliament may remove an Ombudsman or Deputy Ombudsman from office who has forfeited the confidence of the Parliament.
(2) If a Parliamentary Ombudsman retires ahead of time, the Parliament elects a successor without delay to serve for a new four-year period.
 

[Part 2]  The National Audit Office

 
Article 5 Organization and Responsibilities of the National Audit Office
(1) In accordance with Chapter 13, Article 8 of the Instrument of Government, the Parliament elects three Auditors General. One of the Auditors General is Auditor General with administrative responsibility and is responsible for the administrative direction of the authority. The Parliament determines which of the Auditors General has this responsibility.
(2) An Auditor General may not be an undischarged bankrupt, debarred from trading or placed under administration under Chapter 11, Section 7 of the Parental Code. Nor may an Auditor General hold any employment or appointment or engage in any activity which might affect his or her independent status.
 
Article 6 Election of Auditors General
(1) The Auditors General are elected individually. When an Auditor General is elected by secret ballot, the same procedure is applied as for the election of Speakers under Chapter 3, Section 4, paragraph two.
(2) An Auditor General is elected for the period from the date of his or her election, or a later date determined by the Parliament, until a new election has been held in the seventh year thereafter and the person then elected has assumed office. The election is never valid beyond the end of that year. An Auditor General may not be re-elected.
 
Article 13.6.1 Preparation of Election of Auditors General
Elections of the Auditors General are prepared by the Committee on the Constitution.
 
Article 13.6.2 Auditors General's Duty to Report
An Auditor General reports in writing the following circumstances to the Parliament:
1) any ownership and changes regarding ownership of financial instruments under Chapter 1, Section 1 of the Financial Instruments Trading Act (SFS 1991:980);
2) any agreement of a financial nature with a former employer, such as an agreement relating to salary or pension benefits paid during a period covered by his or her appointment at the National Audit Office;
3) any paid employment which is not of a purely temporary nature;
4) any independent income-generating activity pursued alongside his or her appointment as an Auditor General;
5) any appointment at a municipality or county council, if the appointment is not of a purely temporary nature; and
6) any other employment, appointment or ownership which might be presumed to affect the performance of his or her duties.
 
Article 7 Removal from Office of Auditors General
(1) The Parliament may remove an Auditor General from office in response to a request from the Committee on the Constitution.
(2) If an Auditor General retires ahead of time, the Parliament elects a successor without delay to serve for a new seven-year period.
 
Article 8 Parliamentary Council of the National Audit Office
(1) The Parliament elects the Parliamentary Council of the National Audit Office for the electoral period of the Parliament.
(2) The Council consists of one member from each party group under Chapter 3, Article 5. No deputy members is appointed.
(3) The Parliament elects a chair and one or more deputy chairs from among the members of the Council. The chair and each deputy chair are elected individually.
 

[Part 3]  Advisory Council on Foreign and War Delegation

 
Article 9 The Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs
(1) Elections of members of the Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs under Chapter 10, Article 12 of the Instrument of Government are valid for the electoral period of the Parliament.
(2) A Deputy Speaker acts as deputy for the Speaker on the Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs. Nine deputy members are elected.
 
Article 10 Meetings of the Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs
The Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs meets behind closed doors. The Prime Minister may permit also a person other than a member, deputy member, minister or official to be present.
 
Article 13.10.1 Record of Meetings of the Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs
(1) A record is kept of meetings of the Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs. The Secretary of the Council is appointed by the Government.
(2) Deputy members of the Advisory Council are always notified of meetings of the Council.
 
Article 13.10.2 Duty of Confidentiality
A member, deputy member or official present for the first time at a meeting of the Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs affirms that he or she will abide by the duty of confidentiality under Chapter 10, Article 12 of the Instrument of Government.
 
Article 11 War Delegation
(1) In accordance with Chapter 15, Article 2 of the Instrument of Government, the Parliament elects a War Delegation from among its members.
(2) The War Delegation consists of the Speaker as chair and fifty other members whom the Parliament appoints from among its members for the duration of the electoral period. The Delegation elects a deputy chair from among its members in accordance with Chapter 12, Article 16. A member of the Parliament is eligible to be a member of the War Delegation irrespective of whether he or she is also a member of the Government. No deputy members are appointed for the War Delegation.
(3) If a member is permanently prevented from attending after the War Delegation has replaced the Parliament, another member of the Parliament is appointed to replace him or her as laid down in Chapter 12, Article 14.
 
Article 13.11.1 Preparation of the Activities of the War Delegation
The chair and deputy chair of the War Delegation prepare the activities of the Delegation in the event of the Delegation replacing the Parliament.
 
Article 13.11.2 Meetings of the War Delegation
The provisions laid down in Chapter 7, Article 16 and supplementary provisions 7.15.1, paragraph two and 7.15.3--7.15.4 apply to the War Delegation when the Delegation is not acting in place of the Parliament.
 
Article 12 Summons Ordering War Delegation to Replace the Parliament
(1) The Advisory Council on Foreign Affairs convenes in response to a summons from the Speaker, or in his or her absence, a Deputy Speaker, or in response to two other members of the Council, for the purpose of ordering the War Delegation to replace the Parliament under Chapter 15, Article 2 of the Instrument of Government.
(2) The proceedings are conducted by the Speaker, a Deputy Speaker, or if none is present, by the member among those present who has been a member of the Parliament the longest.
(3) In the event of a tied vote, the opinion of the chair prevails.
 

[Part 4]  Boards

 
Article 13 The Election Review Board
(1) The Parliament has an Election Review Board and elects the chair and members of the Board in accordance with Chapter 3, Article 12 of the Instrument of Government.
(2) The Parliament appoints a deputy for the chair by means of a separate election. The provisions laid down in Chapter 3, Article 12 of the Instrument of Government concerning the chair also apply to the deputy.
(3) When a chair or deputy chair is elected by secret ballot, the same procedure is applied as for the election of Speakers, in accordance with Chapter 3, Article 4,
paragraph two.
 
Article 14 The Ministerial Remunerations Board
(1) The Ministerial Remunerations Board consists of a chair and two other members. These are elected individually by the Parliament after each ordinary election to the Parliament and serve until a new election for the Board has been held. No deputy members are appointed.
(2) If, for reasons of ill health or for any other reason, a member is prevented from performing his or her duties, the Parliament elects a replacement to serve in his or her place for as long as the problem persists.
 
Article 13.14.1 Preparation of Elections to the Ministerial Remunerations Board
Elections of members of the Ministerial Remunerations Board are prepared by the Committee on the Constitution.
 
Article 15 The Parliament Remunerations Board
The Parliament Remunerations Board consists of a chair and two other members. These are elected by the Parliament after each ordinary election to the Parliament and serve until a new election for the Board has been held.
 
Article 13.15.1 Preparation of Elections to the Parliament Remunerations Board
Elections of members of the Parliament Remunerations Board are prepared by the Committee on the Constitution.
 
Article 16 The Board for the Remuneration of the Parliamentary Ombudsman and the Auditors General
(1) The Board for the Remuneration of the Parliamentary Ombudsmen and the Auditors General consists of a chair and two other members. These are elected individually by the Parliament and serve until a new election for the Board has been held. No deputy members are appointed.
(2) If, for reasons of ill health or for any other reason, a member is prevented from performing his or her duties, the Parliament elects a replacement to serve in his or her place for as long as the problem persists.
 
Article 13.16.1 Preparation of Elections to the Board for the Remuneration of the Parliamentary Ombudsmen and the Auditors General
Elections of members of the Board for the Remuneration of the Parliamentary Ombudsmen and the Auditors General are prepared by the Committee on the Constitution.
 
Article 17 The Parliament Appeals Board
(1) The Parliament Appeals Board consists of a chair, who holds currently, or has held previously, an appointment as a permanent salaried judge, and who is not a member of the Parliament, and four other members elected by the Parliament from among its members. The chair is elected separately. Elections for the Appeals Boards are valid for the electoral period of the Parliament.
(2) The chair has a deputy. Provisions applying to the chair also apply to the deputy chair. When a chair or deputy chair is elected by secret ballot, the same procedure is applied as for the election of Speakers, in accordance with Chapter 3, Article 4, paragraph two.
 

[Part 5]  Delegations to International Organisations

 
Article 18 Delegation Elected by the Parliament
If an international agreement has been concluded with effect that the Parliament appoints a delegation to an international organization from among its members, rules concerning this may be laid down in a supplementary provision to this Article.
 
Article 13.18.1 The Nordic Council
(1) Each year, the Parliament elects twenty members of the Swedish Delegation to the Nordic Council. They are elected after the start of the new Parliament session and serve until a new election for a delegation has been held.
(2) The delegation reports annually to the Parliament on its activities.
 
Article 13.18.2 The Council of Europe
(1) The Parliament elects six members of the Swedish Delegation to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe. The delegation is elected for the period from 1 November of the year in which an election to the Parliament has been held until the corresponding date following the next election.
(2) A member or a deputy member of the delegation who has left the Parliament in conjunction with an election to the Parliament may continue to serve for the remainder of the delegation's term of office. The delegation reports annually to the Parliament on its activities.
 
Article 13.18.3 The Organization for Security and Co-Operation in Europe
(1) The Parliament elects eight members of the Swedish Delegation to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). The delegation is elected for the electoral period of the Parliament.
(2) The delegation reports annually to the Parliament on its activities.
 
Article 19 Delegations Appointed by the Speaker
(1) The party groups nominate members of the delegations to the Inter-parliamentary Union and the Parliamentary Assembly of the Union for the Mediterranean.
(2) After conferring with the group leaders, the Speaker determines the composition of the delegations. The decision applies for the period determined by the Speaker.
 

[Part 6]  Other Assignments Appointed by Elections within the Parliament

 
Article 20 The Regent
At an election by secret ballot of a Regent, Deputy Regent, or a person qualified to hold office as a Regent ad interim under Chapter 5, Articles 5 and 7 of the Instrument of Government, the same procedure is applied as for the election of Speakers, in accordance with Chapter 3, Article 4, paragraph two. The election is valid until the Parliament determines otherwise.
 
Article 21 The General Council of the Bank of Sweden
Elections of members of the General Council of the Bank of Sweden under Chapter 9, Article 13 of the Instrument of Government are valid for the electoral period of the Parliament.
 
Article 13.21.1 Obstacles to Being a Member of the General Council of the Bank of Sweden
(1) A member of the General Council of the Bank of Sweden may not:
1) be a minister;
2) be a member of the Executive Board of the Bank of Sweden;
3) be a board member or deputy board member of a commercial bank or other undertaking coming under the supervision of the Financial Supervisory Authority; or
4) hold any other employment or appointment which renders him or her unsuitable for appointment as a member of the General Council.
(2) Nor may a member of the General Council be a minor, an undischarged bankrupt, debarred from trading or placed under administration under Chapter 11, Article 7 of the Parental Code.
(3) If a member accepts any employment or appointment that may conflict with the rules of paragraph one, the Parliament removes the member from his or her appointment to the General Council in response to a proposal from the Committee on Finance. Any employment or appointment accepted by a member of the General Council is reported to the Parliament.
 
Article 22 Members of a Convention for Treaty Amendments within the European Union
(1) From among its members the Parliament appoints members and alternates for these members to conventions set up to prepare treaty amendments in the European Union. The Parliament  is to elect new members and deputy members to the convention if a Parliament election takes place while a convention is deliberating. Otherwise the provisions of Chapter 3 Article 5 and Chapter 12, Articles 6-8 and 11 apply to the election of convention members and the provisions of Chapter 12 Article 10 apply to the duties of their deputies.
(2) Convention members are to give an account of the convention's deliberations during their meetings with the Chamber.
 
Article 23 Further Provisions
The Parliament may adopt more detailed provisions concerning Parliament bodies and appoint representatives in certain cases.
 
Article 13.23.1 The Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation
(1) The Parliament determines statutes for the Parliament Tercentenary Foundation and elects twelve members of the Board of the Foundation in accordance with Article 3 of the Foundation's statutes (RFS 1988:1).
(2) The Foundation reports annually to the Parliament on its activities.
 
Article 13.23.2 The Judges Proposals Board
In accordance with Section 4 of the Act on the appointment of permanent salaried judges (2010:1390), the Parliament elects two members to represent the public in the Judges Proposals Board and one personal substitute for each of them.
 
Article 24 Prosecution
(1) Prosecution of officials listed below in respect of offenses committed in the exercise of their assignment or employment may be decided:
1) only by the Committee on Finance in the case of prosecution of a member of the General Council of the Bank of Sweden or a member of the Executive Board of the Bank of Sweden; and
2) only by the Committee on the Constitution in the case of prosecution of a member of the Parliament Board, the Election Review Board or the Parliament Appeals Board, or one of the Parliamentary Ombudsmen, of one of the Auditors General or of the Secretary-General of the Parliament.
(2) The provisions laid down in paragraph one concerning prosecution of a member of the Executive Board of the Bank of Sweden may not apply in respect of an offense committed in the exercise of the Bank of Sweden's decision-making powers under the Act on Exchange Control and Regulation of Credit (SFS 1992:1602).
 

Chapter 14  The Parliament Administration

 

[Part 0  Contents]

 
Article 1 Contents of the Chapter
This chapter contains provisions on:
-- the Parliament Administration (Articles 2 and 3);
-- the direction of the Parliament Administration (Articles 4--7); and
-- prosecution (Article 8).
 

[Part 1]  The Parliament Administration

 
Article 2 The Tasks of the Parliament Administration
(1) The Parliament Administration provides support to the work of the Chamber, the Parliament committees and the Committee on European Union Affairs, as well as assist the members of the Parliament and Parliament bodies with factual information for their work in the Parliament.
(2) In addition, the Parliament Administration is, in respect of the Parliament and authorities under the Parliament, and to the extent determined by the Parliament:
1) responsible for central negotiations with the trade union organizations and represent the authorities under the Parliament in the case of such disputes;
2) draws up proposals for appropriations under the central government budget, but not in respect of the National Audit Office;deal with questions relating to the administration of the Parliament in general, and questions concerning the financial administration of authorities under the Parliament other than the Bank of Sweden; and
4) adopts regulations and recommendations concerning questions under points 1 to 3.
 
Article 14.2.1 Secretariats of the Parliament Committees and the Committee on European Affairs
(1) The Parliament committees and the Committee on European Union Affairs are assisted by secretariats which form part of the Parliament Administration.
(2) The head of such a secretariat is a Swedish citizen.
 
Article 3 Instruction for the Parliament Administration
The Parliament determines instructions for the Parliament Administration.
 

[Part 2]  Direction of the Parliament Administration

 
Article 4 Secretary-General of the Parliament
The Secretary-General of the Parliament is head of the Parliament Administration, ensures that a record is kept of meetings of the Chamber, dispatches the decisions of the Parliament, is Secretary of the War Delegation and assists the Speaker in the work of the Parliament in other respects.
 
Article 5 Election of the Secretary-General
(1) The Parliament elects the Secretary-General of the Parliament. The election is held at the start of the parliamentary session following an ordinary election to the Parliament. It is valid from the time of the election, or another time determined by the Parliament, until a new election of the Secretary- General has been held and he or she has taken up the appointment.
(2) If the election is held by secret ballot, then the candidate who receives three quarters or more of the votes cast is elected. If no such majority is obtained, a new election is held. If no candidate receives three quarters or more of the votes cast on this occasion either, the election will be prepared again.
 
Article 14.5.1 Preparation of Election of the Secretary-General of the Parliament
The election of the Secretary-General of the Parliament is prepared by a group consisting of the Speaker and the group leaders.
 
Article 6 Dismissal of the Secretary-General
At the request of the Parliament Board, the Parliament may dismiss a Secretary-General of the Parliament who has grossly neglected his or her commitments to the Parliament.
 
Article 7 Acting Secretary-General
If the Parliament is without a Secretary-General, the Parliament elects a Secretary-General for such time until an ordinary Secretary-General has been elected and has taken up the appointment.
 

[Part 3]  Appeals

 
Article 8 Appeals against Decisions by the Parliament Administration
Decisions by a Parliament body in an administrative matter against which appeals may be lodged under special provisions are examined by an administrative court in cases determined by the Parliament, and by the Parliament Appeals Board in other cases.
 
Transitional Provisions
1. This Act comes into force on 1 September 2014, when the Parliament Act (1974:153) will cease to apply.
2. If a law or other statute refers to provisions in the Parliament Act (1974:153) which have been superseded with provisions in this Act, the new provisions apply.
3. Regulations communicated pursuant to the Parliament Act (1974:153) and which apply when this Act comes into force are considered to be communicated in accordance with this Act.
4. Decisions made pursuant to the Parliament Act (1974:153) are considered to be made pursuant to this Act.
5. Elections that are carried out pursuant to the Parliament Act (1974:153) are considered to be carried out pursuant to this Act.
6. Matters that are introduced within the Parliament before 1 September 2014, but which have not yet been settled are dealt with in accordance with this Act.
2015:382
1 This Act comes into force on 1 September 2015.
2 The Act is applied for the first time with regard to the central government budget in 2016.
 
Appendix (Supplementary provision 7.5.1)
1. The Committee on the Constitution prepares matters concerning
a. legislation of a constitutional and general administrative nature;
b. legislation concerning radio, television and film;
c. freedom of expression, formation of public opinion and freedom of worship;
d. financial support for the press and the political parties;
e. the National Audit Office, in respect of the election of an Auditor General, the removal of an Auditor General from office and the prosecution of an Auditor General;
f. the Parliament, and authorities under the Parliament in general, except for the Bank of Sweden;
g. the county administration and the division of the country into administrative units;
h. local self-government;
i. the consent of the Parliament to the prosecution of a member of the Parliament or interference with the personal liberty of a member; and
j. appropriations falling within expenditure area 1 Governance.
2. The Committee on Finance prepares matters concerning
a. monetary, credit, currency and central government debt policy;
b. the credit and finance markets;
c. the commercial insurance market;
d. the National Audit Office, insofar as these matters do not fall to the Committee on the
Constitution to prepare;
e. local government finance;
f. the State as employer, national statistics, accounting, audits and administrative efficiency;
g. State property and public procurement in general;
h. other questions of administrative finance not solely concerned with a particular subject area;
i. budgetary questions of a technical nature; and
j. appropriations falling within expenditure areas 2 Economy and financial administration, 25 General grants to local government, 26 Interest on central government debt, etc. and 27 The contribution to the European Union.
3. The Committee on Taxation prepares matters concerning
a. tax assessment and tax collection;
b. the population registers;
c. the enforcement service; and
d. appropriations falling within expenditure area 3 Taxes, customs and enforcement.
4. The Committee on Justice prepares matters concerning
a. the law courts;
b. the leasehold and rent tribunals;
c. the public prosecution service;
d. the police service;
e. forensic medicine;
f. the correctional care system;
g. the Penal Code, the Code of Judicial Procedure and acts of law which supersede or are closely associated with provisions of these Codes; and
h. appropriations falling within expenditure area 4 Justice.The Committee on Civil Affairs prepares matters concerning
a. the Marriage, Children and Parents, Inheritance, Land, Commercial and Debt Enforcement Codes and acts of law which supersede or are related to provisions of these Codes, insofar as these matters do not fall to any other committee to prepare;
b. insurance contract law;
c. company law;
d. law of torts;
e. transport law;
f. bankruptcy law;
g. consumer policy;
h. international private law;
i. legislation on other matters having the nature of general private law;
j. housing provision and other housing policy;
k. legislation on planning and construction, as well as other closely related matters;
l. water rights;
m. expropriation, the formation of property units and land survey; and
n. appropriations falling within expenditure area 18 Community planning, housing provision, construction and consumer policy.
6. The Committee on Foreign Affairs prepares matters concerning
a. relations and agreements of the Realm with other states and with international organizations;
b. development assistance to other countries;
c. other foreign trade and international economic cooperation insofar as these matters do not fall to any other committee to prepare; and
d. appropriations falling within expenditure areas 5 International cooperation, and 7 International development cooperation.
7. The Committee on Defense prepares matters concerning
a. military and civil defense;
b. emergency and rescue services;
c. measures to reduce the vulnerability of society;
d. nuclear safety and protection against radiation;
e. maritime rescue and coastguard services insofar as these matters do not fall to any other committee to prepare; and
f. appropriations falling within expenditure area 6 Defense and contingency measures.
8. The Committee on Social Insurance prepares matters concerning
a. the Social Insurance Code and acts of law which supersede or are related to provisions of these Codes, insofar as these matters do not fall to any other committee to prepare;
b. family benefits;
c. benefits in the event of sickness or occupational injury;
d. benefits in old age;
e. benefits to surviving dependents;
g. sick pay;
h. social security contributions;
i. migration;
j. Swedish citizenship; and
k. appropriations falling within expenditure areas 8 Migration, 10 Financial security for the sick and disabled, 11 Financial security for the elderly and 12 Financial security for families and children.
9. The Committee on Health and Welfare prepares matters concerning
a. care and welfare services for children and young people insofar as these matters do not fall to any other committee to prepare;
b. care and welfare of the elderly and the disabled;
c. measures to combat drug and alcohol abuse, and other social services questions;
d. alcohol policy measures;
e. health and medical care;
f. social welfare questions in general; and
g. appropriations falling within expenditure area 9 Health care, medical care and social services.
10. The Committee on Cultural Affairs prepares matters concerning
a. cultural and educational purposes in general;
b. cultural heritage;
c. popular education;
d. youth activities;
e. international cultural cooperation;
f. sports and outdoor activities;
g. supervision and regulation of the gaming market;
h. religious communities, insofar as these do not fall to the Committee on the Constitution to prepare;
i. radio and television, insofar as these do not fall to the Committee on the Constitution to prepare; and
j. appropriations falling within expenditure area 17 Culture, media, religious communities and leisure activities.
11. The Committee on Education prepares matters concerning
a. the school system, certain special types of education and other educational activities;
b. higher education, research and space issues;
c. financial support for students; and
d. appropriations falling within expenditure areas 15 Financial support for students and 16 Education and academic research.
12. The Committee on Transport and Communications prepares matters concerning
a. roads and road transport;
b. railways and rail transport;
c. ports and shipping;
d. airports and civil aviation;
e. postal services;
f. electronic communications;
g. IT policy; and
h. appropriations falling within expenditure area 22 Transport and communications.
13. The Committee on Environment and Agriculture prepares matters concerning
a. agriculture, forestry, horticulture, hunting and fishing;
b. meteorological services;
c. nature conservation;
d. other environmental protection questions not falling to any other committee to prepare; and
e. appropriations falling within expenditure areas 20 General environmental protection and nature conservation and 23 Land- and water-based industries, rural areas and food.
14. The Committee on Industry and Trade prepares matters concerning
a. general guidelines for industry and trade policy and associated research questions;
b. industry and handicrafts;
c. trade;
d. intellectual property law;
e. energy policy;
f. regional growth policy;
g. state-owned enterprises;
h. price and competition conditions in the business sector; and
i. appropriations falling within expenditure areas 19 Regional growth, 21 Energy and 24 Industry and trade.
15. The Committee on the Labour Market prepares matters concerning
a. labour market policy, including unemployment insurance;
b. working life policy, including labour law, work environment and matters relating to wage formation;
c. integration;
d. measures to combat discrimination, insofar as these matters do not fall to any other committee to prepare; and
e. equality between women and men, insofar as these matters do not fall to any other committee to prepare.
f. appropriations falling within expenditure areas 13 Gender equality and introduction of newly arrived immigrants 14 Labour market and working life.

For methodology see: Comparing Constitutions and International Constitutional Law.
© 1994 - April 3rd, 2016 / Thanks to A. Meister. / For corrections please contact A. Tschentscher.